US 3440027: "AUTOMATED PACKAGING OF SEMICONDUCTORS (OCR)"



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Patent Overview

Patent Title: AUTOMATED PACKAGING OF SEMICONDUCTORS (OCR)
Patent Number: 3440027 Filing Date: Jun 22, 1966
Application Number: Issue Date: Apr 22, 1969
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Referenced By:

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Patent Number Issue Date Title Author
3978516 Aug 31, 1976 Lead frame assembly for a packaged semiconductor microcircuit Noe, Terry Wayne
4316320 Feb 23, 1982 Method of manufacturing electronic circuit apparatus Nogawa, Kenji; Takemura, Katsuyoshi; Okada, Yoshifumi
4616412 Oct 14, 1986 Method for bonding electrical leads to electronic devices Schroeder, Jon M.
4711700 Dec 08, 1987 Method for densifying leadframe conductor spacing Cusack, Michael D.
4754912 Jul 05, 1988 Controlled collapse thermocompression gang bonding Burns, Carmen D.
6091136 Jul 18, 2000 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
6316824 Nov 13, 2001 Plastic leads frames for semiconductor devices Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
6544820 Apr 08, 2003 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices, packages including same, and methods of fabrication Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
6872600 Mar 29, 2005 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices, packages including same, and methods of fabrication Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
7489248 Feb 10, 2009 RFID tags and processes for producing RFID tags Gengel, Glenn W.; Hadley, Mark A.; Pounds, Tom; Schatz, Kenneth D.; Drzaic, Paul S.
4422708 Dec 27, 1983 Support device for integrated circuit Birnholz, Jean
5218172 Jun 08, 1993 Metallized frame which interconnects etched wirings for integrated circuits Seidel, Wolfgang
4028722 Jun 07, 1977 Contact bonded packaged integrated circuit Helda, Robert W.
4380042 Apr 12, 1983 Printed circuit lead carrier tape Angelucci, Sr., Thomas L.; Angelucci, Joseph L.
6294410 Sep 25, 2001 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices, packages including same, and methods of fabrication Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
6841422 Jan 11, 2005 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices, packages including same, and methods of fabrication Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
4766670 Aug 30, 1988 Full panel electronic packaging structure and method of making same Gazdik, Charles E.; McBride, Donald G.; Seraphim, Donald P.; Toole, Patrick A.
4987366 Jan 22, 1991 Oscillator damped test and evaluation circuit for a proximity switch Hamel, Manfred
5367198 Nov 22, 1994 Proximity detector with error-preventing ambient condition compensation Buergel, Johannes; Lamarche, Jean-Luc; Schiff, Andreas; Westrup, Klaus-Peter
7688206 Mar 30, 2010 Radio frequency identification (RFID) tag for an item having a conductive layer included or attached Carrender, Curt
7868766 Jan 11, 2011 RFID tags and processes for producing RFID tags Gengel, Glenn W.; Hadley, Mark A.; Pounds, Tom; Schatz, Kenneth D.; Drzaic, Paul S.
4681654 Jul 21, 1987 Flexible film semiconductor chip carrier Clementi, Robert J.; Gazdik, Charles E.; Lafer, William; Lovesky, Roy L.; McBride, Donald G.; Munson, Joel V.; Skarvinko, Eugene P.
4065717 Dec 27, 1977 Multi-point microprobe for testing integrated circuits Kattner, Lionel E.; Youmans, Albert P.; Shasby, Patrick J.
4236777 Dec 02, 1980 Integrated circuit package and manufacturing method Merlina, Joseph F.; Redmond, John P.; Ulbrich, George; Wagner, Richard M.
6724073 Apr 20, 2004 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices and packages including same Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
6762485 Jul 13, 2004 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
6979889 Dec 27, 2005 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
4900501 Feb 13, 1990 Method and apparatus for encapsulating semi-conductors Saeki, Junichi; Kaneda, Aizo; Ozawa, Masakazu; Nakagawa, Takashi; Nishi, Kunihiko
4810865 Mar 07, 1989 Method for recycling a card having an incorporated component, and a card designed to permit recycling Gloton, Jean P.; Peres, Philippe
5057461 Oct 15, 1991 Method of mounting integrated circuit interconnect leads releasably on film Fritz, Galen F.
4438181 Mar 20, 1984 Electronic component bonding tape Schroeder, Jon M.
4806409 Feb 21, 1989 Process for providing an improved electroplated tape automated bonding tape and the product produced thereby Walter, Jackie A.; Sharenow, Brett; Walker, Robert; Voss, Scott V.
4306925 Dec 22, 1981 Method of manufacturing high density printed circuit Lebow, Sanford; Nogavich, Daniel
3950843 Apr 20, 1976 Continuous film transistor fabrication process Horton, Arthur E.; Brantley, Jordan W.; Smith, Paul R.; Lightfoot, Cecil W.; Hanneman, Richard L.
3968563 Jul 13, 1976 Precision registration system for leads Hamlin, Arthur Houser
4049903 Sep 20, 1977 Circuit film strip and manufacturing method Kobler, Robert James
4343083 Aug 10, 1982 Method of manufacturing flexible printed circuit sheets Takemura, Katsuyoshi; Kondo, Masatoshi; Hasuike, Fumio; Okada, Yoshifumi
4855867 Aug 08, 1989 Full panel electronic packaging structure Gazdik, Charles E.; McBride, Donald G.; Seraphim, Donald P.; Toole, Patrick A.
5389191 Feb 14, 1995 Mounting apparatus for deploying an electronic component mounts formed on a tape carrier Muramatsu, Eiji; Kamimura, Masaru
6124151 Sep 26, 2000 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices, packages including same, and methods of fabrication Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
6323543 Nov 27, 2001 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices, packages including same, and methods of fabrication Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
6787399 Sep 07, 2004 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices, packages including same, and methods of fabrication Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
7005731 Feb 28, 2006 Plastic lead frames for semiconductor devices and packages including same Jiang, Tongbi; King, Jerrold L.
4411719 Oct 25, 1983 Apparatus and method for tape bonding and testing of integrated circuit chips Lindberg, Frank A.
4438847 Mar 27, 1984 Film carrier for an electrical conductive pattern Fritz, Otmar
4701363 Oct 20, 1987 Process for manufacturing bumped tape for tape automated bonding and the product produced thereby Barber, Larry J.
7559131 Jul 14, 2009 Method of making a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag Credelle, Thomas Lloyd; Gengel, Glenn; Stewart, Roger Green; Joseph, William Hill
8350703 Jan 08, 2013 RFID tags and processes for producing RFID tags Gengel, Glenn W.; Hadley, Mark A.; Pounds, Torn; Schatz, Kenneth D.; Drzaic, Paul S.

Description

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April 22 1969 F. HUGLE 3@4409027 AUTOMATED PACKAGING OF SEMICONDUCTORS Filed June 22, 1966 Sheet of 3 T 10 10 FIGTIRE 2 T INVENTOP-


April 22, 1969 F. HUGLE 3t44OpO27 AUTOMATED FACKAOING OF SEMICONBUCTORS Filed June 22, 1966 Sheet of 3 5 9 RIGURE 3 INVENTOP.


April 22, 1969 F. HUGLE 3t44OpO27 AUTOMATED FACKAGINO OF SEMICONDUCTORS Filed Jtne 22, 1966 Sheet of 3. FIGURE 5 51 ME@51 E3.e- ae5i ml== 2 L@j


3 @ 4 4 0 , 0 2 7 United States Patent Office Patented Apr. 22, 1969 3,440,027 AUTOMATED PACKAGING OF SEMICONDUCTORS Frances Hugle, Santa Clara, Calif., assignor to Frances Hugle as trustee of Frances Hugle trust 5 Filed June 22, 1966, Ser. No. 559,622 int. Cl. noii 1/00 U.S. Cl. 29-193.5 8 Claims 10 ABSTRACT OF THE DISCLOSURE A continuous roll form array of packages for Rip- chip semiconductor devices and integrated circuits wherein the delicate metal conductors - to which the chips are face bonded are sup_ported on a flexible insulating strip. This 15 strip supports an entire roll of packages and provides in- dexing holes along the sides. The individual packages may contain more than one chip and may provide chip to chip interconnections. The number of external electrical pack- 20 age connections is unlimited. T'his invention teaches a method for manufacturing a semiconductor package in a continuous and automatic fashion, wherein the attachment of the semiconductor to 25 the package and the forming of all electrical contacts is made in one operation which is part of the continuous processing of the package. It is an object of this invention to provide a methlod of packaging semiconductors which is substantially cheaper 30 than the methods now practiced. It is a further object of this invention to produce finished semiconductors in a continuous strip suitable for automatic handling at testing stations as well as automatic insertion into electronic equipment. 35 Other objects and the attendant advantages of this in- vention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes understood by reference to the following detailed descrip- tion when considered in connection with the accompany- 40 ing drawings. The packages are formed in flexible strips which can be rolled for easy handling and transferring from one ma- chine to another. A roll 12" in diameter and 1" wide would produce about 15,000 packages with 14 leads each 45 each on . 1 00" centers. Fewer leads or closer spacing would result in more packages as more leads or wider spac'mg results in -fewer packages. This procedure is particularly suitable for integrated circuits because of the large num- ber of leads required, but it has substantial @advantages 50 also for multichip assemblies and individual transistors. Starting with a laminate consisting of a metal 1, such as copper or an alloy of nickel, iron and cob@alt, on;a flexible insulator 2, such as polyethylene terephthalate, an array of patterns 3 is etched in the metal such that the central por- .55 tion of each pattern provides a contact point 4 for each contact of a semiconductor "flip-chip@' or of a group of semiconductor "flil3-chips." FIGURE 1 shows an array of patterns, some with "flip- chips" already attached. . 60 FIGURE 2 shows an enlarged view of part of one pat- tern. FIGURE 3 shows an enlarged view of the central sec- tion of one pattern. FIGURE 4 shows a single finished package with la r,5 moulded body enclosing the semiconductor(s) and part of the patterned laminate. FIGURE 5 shows an alternate embodiment of multiple width of the insulating layer. The peripheral section of the pattern corresponds to the 70 desired lead arrangement on the finished package. The con- tinuous insulating layer 2 supports the delicate "wireg" 5 2 Of the pattem and maintains them in the proper spatial arrangement to each other. Without this support, it would be very difficult and correspondingly expensive to hafidle these patterns once they have been etched. The pattern in the central portion (FIGURE 3) would typically contain metal strips 5 mils wide on 10 mil centers, while the peripheral section might have .030" leads on. 100" centers. In'order to have good definition of the delicate central portion which accepts the semiconductor chip (or chips), the metal cannot be too thick, 2 to 4 mils being a good r.@tnge. If no great strength or rigidity is required of the external leads, the original metal layer may be 2 to 4 mils thick and the entire pattern may be etched in one operation. However, it is usually required that the external leads be @omewhat thicker, 7 to 12 mils, or even more. In this stuation, the pattern will be improved by a three step etch. The central section is thinned to the desired thickness by etching (see FIGURE 3), then the central pattern is etched thru. In a separate etching step, which may precede or follow the foregoing, the peripheral thicker part of the pattern is etched. To facilitate easy registration from one etching operation to the next, as well as for later ease of handling, it is advisable to punch indexing holes 6 on one or both sides of the strip. Leaving a continuous metal strip 7 to enclose the indexing holes improves the dimensional accuracy considerably. Etching may be done with conventional resist techniques, using either photoresist or screened resists. The method of chip attachment depends on the type of flip-chip. To attach chips that have raised solderable bumps, the etched patterns is pretinned 8 and the chip is placed upside down and heated to effect mechanical and electrical contact. At the same time the contact points of the pattern are being tinned, it is often desirable to tin the ends of the peripheral leads also. Wave soldering is one technique that works well, the areas not requiring tinning are protected with a resist. Chips without raised solderable bumps are easily attached ultrasonically if small protrusions 9 are formed on the contact areas of the pattem. These may be produced by etching approximately 1/2 mil of metal away from the central area except at the points of actual contact. Other flip-chip attachment techniques may be developed which are compatible with this packaging method. Once the chip 10 has been attached, a top is moulded on 11, by injection or transfer moulding techniques, to protect the chips (or chips) and give strength and rigidity to the package. While still in strip form and with indexing holes alongside, the finished devices can be rapidly fed into automatic test- equipment, which can either mark the bad devices, record them on tape, or, for high level automation, cut them out and splice the strip together again. If the finished units aTe not to be delaminated from the insulating film, and there is usually no reason to delaminate a punch can be used to remove the film from between the ieads. If the leads are to be bent at right angles, as in the currently popular- "dual-in-line" package, the strip can be fed into a suitable die. However, one of the advantages of this technique is that it is never necessary to handle the packages individually. Large users of two terminal devices (resistors, diodes, etc.) already purchase these components in loiag strips and automatically feed them into their proper positions on printed circuit boards, bending the leads just before insertion. With the method outlined in this application, it is now possible to do the same thing with the most complex integrated circuit or multichip subsystem. Even greater efficiency may be obtained by forming the packages on strips wide enough for several rows. Most readily available continuous etchers, as well as resist screeners and contact printers that would be used to produce the pattems will handle rolls 12" wide or more. If


3,440,027 3 necessary, the rolls can be split into single widths before loading into the station for attaching the flip-chips. Having thus described the invention, what is claimed is: 1. A lead frame for a plurality of semiconductor de- vices, each having terminals arranged in a predetermined 5 pattem upon one side of each of said devices, comprising; (a) a single elongated flexible insulator (2), (b) a singie repetitive pattern of metal (1) having a width less than the width of said elongated insulator, with each repetition of said pattern having plural 10 fingers (5), converging, respectively, to mate with said predetermined pattern, and (c) each said repetition of said pattern of metal being bonded to said flexible insulator. 2. The lead frame of claim 1, in which; 15 (a) the thickness of each of said plural flngers (5) is less than the, thickness of the remainder of said pattem of metal. 3. The lead frame of claim 2, in which; (a) the thickness of each of said plural fingers (5) is of 20 the order of one-third that of the remainder of said pattern of metal. 4. The lead frame of claim 1, in which; (a) each repetition of said repetitive pattern of metal (1) is separate from other repetitions, whereby separate electricai connections can be 25 made to each said repetition of said pattern. S. 'ne lead frame of claim 1, in which; (a) the thickness of the central portion of each of said plural fingers is less than the thickness of the re- so mainder of said pattern of metal, and (b) the thickness of the extremity of each of said plural fingers is greater than the thickness of said central portion, whereby protrusions (9) are formed on each said 35 extremity. 6. The lead frame of claim 5, in which; 4 (a) each said protrusion (9) is pretinned (8) upon the surface thereof away from said flexible insulator (2). 7. The lead frame of claim 1, which additionally in- cludes; (a) a series of holes equally spaced len.thwise of said elongated flexible insulator out of electrical contact -%vith said repetitive pattern of metal, whereby separate electrical connections can be made to each repetition of said pattern. 8. The lead frame of claim 1, in which; (a) said single elongated flexible insulator has @ a width that is a multiple of the width of said single repetitive pattem of metal, and (b) the whole of each of a plurality of repetitive patterns of metal are bonded mutually parallel longitudinally upon said elongated insulator. References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,849,298 8/1958 Werberig ------------- 156-3 3,192,307 6/1965 Lazar. 3,317,287 5/1967 Caracciolo. 3,178,506 5/1965 Dereich et al. 3,203,075 8/1965 Foster et al - -------- 29-155.5 3,204,329 9/1965 Sweeney ----------- 29-155.5 3,256,465 6/1966 Weissenstern et al. 3,281,6Z8 10/1966 Bauer et al. 3,292,241 12/1966 Carroll. FOREIGN PATENTS 1,374,721 8/1964 France. DARRELL L. CLAY, Primary Examiner. U.S. Cl. X.R. 317-235; 206-65, 56; 113-119; 29-627; 174-68.5, 52

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