US 2700446: "TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER (OCR)"



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Patent Overview

Patent Title: TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER (OCR)
Patent Number: 2700446 Filing Date: Oct 13, 1950
Application Number: Issue Date: Jan 25, 1955
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Description

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Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 1 CL a_Ca INVENTOR 0-51aae ezz B ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 2 ceF ---- ......... INVENTOR ,folwlp 0 Elool4n",21 ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct, 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 3, 0 0 0 tq m u ?---- IN@ENT@R 'PO/W 1'17 0 fl/O ATTORN EY


Jan. 25, 1955 E, 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets- Sheet 4 74 7@ 77 5-6 7a 71 92 7Z 7@' '7 ,@4 7,7 ,@19 INVENTOR fol#,IN Ogloi@,ell ATTORNEY


Jan. 25. 1955 Filed Oot. 13, 1950 32 7- E. 0. BLODGETT TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER 4/ 7@ 61 2,700,446 aa @beets-Sheet 5 1-71 fo@r 17 0 91,2C)@?11 ATTORNT@Y


Jan. 25, 1955 F:. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed@Oct. 13, 1950 33 $heets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR @sE E3Y ATTORi'qEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 7 1711) T.! c:q.L L :::Zz 1 Z INVENTOP BYe ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYFEWRITER Filed Got. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 8 0 Fi@ INVENTOR BY ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYFEWRITER Filed Oot. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 9 Lo ri ri ZSni)cntor ZVnll@7 0,51001 ,qell attorneb


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 $heets-Sheet 10 19@' 196 202 A13 I F@. 149 lf2 157 149 I-T T INVENTOR Cd)Yil? 0. 31odgete BY ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed QQt. 13, 1950 33 $heets-Sheet 11 N Fi@ N .Fl I N V E N T O R folwli7 O.Bloo l BY A T T O R N E Y


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 12 a Ids dl2 810 @22 224 812 220 . 9 2,?2 INVENTOR. falWI@7 BY


Jan. 25, 1955 fr. 0. BLobGETr 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 @heets-Sheet 13 77a 0 0 7@ 7b INVENTOR. B Y JITI-Oflyzy


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 14 -7@ c INVENTOR fdwl'a O.Oloolye2@ ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 21700,446 TAPE CONTROLTED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 15 Z20 zl@ 11,7@ 117 4161 117J ----- -T 71 A h ,,f 7 INVENTOR ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONT@OLLED TYPEWRITER Til6ed oQt. 1,3, 1950 3 3 S h e et s- S h e et 1 6 0 N INVENTOR Val 03loo@ /1 B y ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E..O. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed oqt. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 17 -7- :LSZ7 117 zzzzl_- I 0 ,at N ENT BY ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2t7OO,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oot. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet IS n @l 7; Z7J zzz 5 Zl Joe_": z@z -ZOO/ 271 Z71 - ZA@16 INVENTOR ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER FilQd 33 $heets-Sheet 19 El tq -7 INVENTOR E3YOtl-@' ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955, E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed oQt, 13, 1950 33 $heets-Sheet 2Q Z)i @)f z 7 INVENTOR folw/,/7 OJ@o(:/( li ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 9. 0. E3LODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct4,@ 13, 1950 33 Shee@.-s- She@t 21 INVENTOR B ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 22 lifill iiiii iq INVEARTOR. folw/@ Offloolqei@ BY l@7TOIfNL-Y


Jan. 25, 1955 P. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITE.R Filed Oot. 15, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 23 921 J92 (2) TO ---------------- 312- - J24 .f 75, j@7 rX r=l 1)7 J79 -T71 INVENTOR fO'0-117 0,,1510d .@Ul? BY ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYFEWRITER Filed Oot. 13, 1950 33 $heets-Sheet 24 4 77, 00 429 42 419- T-1 426 4Y2 W2 429 465, 4199 426 INVENTOR A T T O R N E Y


Jan. 25p 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 21,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Fi-led Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 25 /o@ /FCC INVENTOR fo,i4lll7 0 BY 4Z24 ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYFEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 26 lag VI 4@z ol IUVENTOR BY ATTORNEY


Ja' n. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 27 ----------- ----------- INVENTOR BY lt4 ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAFE OONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oot. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet @8 ,@rl2 14VENTOR ATTORNEY


Jan. 25,, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER @'iled Oct. 13, 1950 33 Sheets-Sheet 29 -4- F@ PB4 ,-g5 P96 INVENTOR. Ealwin 0 Bloclyell By tl-2 ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950, 33 Sheets-Sheet 30 El -- ------------------ Y,7 ------------------ ------------- INVENTOR. 0 BloL-Igell BY A TTORA(E Y


Jan. 25, 195.ej fr. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950 33 $heets-Sheet 31 90V Pi-c ARR Pa,?ch On @@O 7 Tape FeeLY PCM Code,Pe le ,b Code S@arl Read DCR [7 CRT-C BSC 0 s to)o KLM STAR INVENTOR cdwl@? 0 BIOO" L BY A,@2 ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER 7iled Qct. 13, 1950 33 $heets-Sheet 32 F- c5c ECA ECB ECC ECD ECE ECF scc sci sc2 SC3 SC4 SC6 R Plrl,3 i'IV4 ilIM6- PM61 RC RC;' -RC6 R@5 -El 7E7 7-mil Lm2L INVENTOR CL fc-lwll? 0 bloqlqel@ @2 BYA',W@ ATTORNEY


Jan. 25, 1955 E. 0. BLODGETT 2,700,446 TAPE CONTROLLED TYPEWRITER Filed Oct. 13, 1950. 33 Sheets-Sheet 33 - 7:@EE. =9 F= A 612 345' il2 316 12 JWf & 2 0 00 00 0 0006 .5 0 P 4 O:oo 0 00 0 00 :0 $ 0 a a o o 000 0 0 00 0 0 0 00 0 00 600 9 6 0 :o 0 :00 F 0000 0 1 7 0 6: 00 o T- 00 6 a 000 0000 00'00 0 9 0 000 0000 oo'c' ooo 0 0000 0000 o o(jo 0 0 0 0 C, 0 00000 0 cooo 00 0 0 0 0 0 oo 0 L 0 00 0 Y (0 0 0 0 0 0000 0 0 0 z 0 000000 LOArf C19Sf o Do 0 L INf SP46f COO 0000 dfLErl, 0 0 0 0 0 0000 I)PPER egse 00 0 0 Bg elf xpcf 0 0 00 FTOP XOf 0 0 0 CL 611? 0 00000 o 0 o 0 11 0 000 00 lhre,- ZI,7115 17,91 IlSed Lolgl- - fhllz il,4,'92ol- fhlfl 0 000000 ITab T,7 h 0 0. 5fl@Iff7lflfl,4 Z fZlTf INVENTOR. fawil? 0 61o,21ye II BY ATTOR.ffEY


Uni'ted States Patent Office 21700,446 P - a t e n t e d J a n . 2 5 , 1 9 5 5 2,700,446 TA'PE CONIROLLED TYPEIVRITER :Ed@vin 0. Blodgett, Rochester, N. Y., -assignor to Coni- niercial Controls Coi-poration, Rochester, @N. Y., a cor- poration of Delaware Application October 13, 1950, Serial -iNo. 1899980 14 Claims. (Cf. 197-20) ;g machine. More particularly, it relates to a machipe ill w.hich a coiitrol tape may be coded by perforating and in which such control tape may then be used for the automatic control of the writing machine in reproduciing COPY. 20 It is an object of this invention to provide a machine of the character indicated wherein the several operative units are substantially self-contained so that -they may @be assembled in a common base for producing a ma- chine which may serve as a recorder-reproducer, a re- 2.5 corder alone, or a@reproducer alone. The invention there- by affords a high degree of flexibility in the inanner in 'whi@h stich machines may be constituted and in the end functions obtained therefrom. It is a specific object of the invention to provide an 11) improved case @hift mechaiiism having a key lever con- trolled cam for operating the type basket in one direc- .tion and a different key lever controlled cam.for oper- ating the basket in the other direction, the cams being operative to break a toggle @,vhich provides the desir6d 5 accelerated motion and also serves to lock- the basket ill each position of operation. It is a f-Lirther specific object of the invention to pro- vide an improved carr@.age return mechanism wheroin a key lever controlled cam operates a carriage return 40 clutch which is hbld engaged until the carriage, upon reaching its 'fully returned position, trips a second cani 'which fur-iiishes the power for disengaging the clutch, whereby the clutcli is illowed to slip riiomentarily at the end of the carriage rettirn while the second cam is 45 operated, thereby dissipating the rebound force. It is a further specific object of the invention to pro- vide power controlled ribbon shift mechanism operable upon depression of a key lever to shif t the ribbon be- tween two printing fields. 1)0 It is a further specific object of the invention to pro- vide an 'integrated writin.9 machine structure wherein a punch mechanism, a tape reader and code translating me@hanism are dU driven from a single power shaft to provide increased flexibility and e,,ise of operation. It is a further specific object of the invention to pro- vide tape reader controlled c-'@rcuits Where codes having one characteristic are effective to automatically stop op- ,eration of the reader until starled by a function of the writing machine, and codes having another characteristic 60 Whidh are effective to automaticaily stop operation of the:writing machine until started manually. It is a further object of the invention to provide iii a writing machine having a keyboard and a p4per carriage, an escapement mechanism adapted to variably release 6 @r, the carriage in letter spacing in. proportioii to the widtil of the letter finpressions and under the control of a plurality of electromagnetic devices for variably con- trolling ;the escapement of the carriage. To this end a selector inechanism is provided under the control oi' the 70 keys of the keyboard, and there are means under con- trol of the selector mechanism for energizing the elec- tromagnetic escapement devices either singly or in coni- bination. It is a further object of the invention to provide a im,proved type action for power gperated t3Tewriters which includes a toggle linkage havin.- means for adjtisliiig the effective len.-th thereof. To the end that the gener@l objectives of the invention ,5 may 'be attained, the machine herein comprises apower operated writing machine having code selecting means operative upon depressio n ol a key lever to.select a code represent ative of the character controlled by such lever, together with a tape punch controlled by the l@ey con- 1( troiiec[ selector for prodicing iii a t-,ipe cowbiiiati oual code perforatio ns. The ma@hine also includes means for sensing a tape perforate d as stated and for translating -such perforatio ns to the end that the power operated type action may be under the control of the perforate d tape carriage rebound control mechanism which includes a TS return contact; tabulating stop for arresting movement of the carriage Fig. 20b is a fragmentary view in elevation of lizikage together with a latch device operative upon contact with @hown in Fig. 19 for operating a carriage control contact the tabulation sto for eng4ging the stop to latch the during line spacing operations; .P @earriage against rebound thereof. 80 Fig. 21 is a sectional view on line 21-21 @bf Fig. 19; It ris a,further object of the invention to provide an Fig. 22 illustrates the carriage return control clutch and pose of the inventioii to provide a writing machine Which ma be used as a co@iventional t owriter without in any 'Y yp way disturbing the code producing or code controlled mechanism provided therein. It is an important object of the invention to provide a- perforated tape controlled writing machine which is capable of duplicating all or any part of the control tape while the rnachine is operating tinder the influence of such control tape. Specific objects, features and advantages of the invention will become clear as the description of the machine is read in light of the drawings in which: f@'ig. I is an exterior perspective view of the writing machine constituting the invention; Fig. 2 is a horizontal sectional view through the machine at a point itist above the keyboard; - Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view through the keyboard, ti,@e ti-arisiitiiig cinit, the power roller, the type @asket.and part oi the code seiecting mechanism; Fig. 4'is a detail view.of toggle inechanism for shifting the type basket to,lower case position; Fig. 5 is a view siniilar to Fig. 4 and shows the toggle linkage in the released positior, assumed when the type ba@ket is in upper case position; Fig. 6 is a detail view of, the toggle mechanism for shifting the type basket to ..@ipper case position; Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6 but @hows the toggle linkage in the released position Nvhich it assumes when the 'basket is shifted to lower case position; Fig. 8 is a detail view of the ribbon ,shifting mechanism; Fig. 9 is a view of -the meenan-sm at the right hand portion of Fig. 8, showing the elements in shifted position; Fig. 10 is a view taken on line 10- 10 of Fig..8; . Fig. II is a detailed view of the _platen indexirig mechanism; Fig. 12 is a view taken on line 12-12 of Fig. 1 1; 'Fig. 13 is an end elevational view of the carriage; Fi . 14 is aplan view of the escapement- mechanism; Fig. 15 is a vertical sectional view through.the power roller, the type basket, the carriage and the escapement mechanism; Fig. 16 is a vertical sectional view taken on line 16-16 of Fig. 15; .'Fig. 17 is a large scale detail view of part of the car- ria e release mechanism; ,9 Fig. 18 is a sectional view on line 18- 18 of Fig. 17; Fig. 19 is a rear elevation of the tabulating and carriage release'mechanism; Fig. 19a is a fragmen tary plan view made in section of F i g . 1 9 s h o w i n g c a r r i a g e r e b o u n d l a t c h ; Fig. 1 9 h i s a f r a g m e n t a r y e l e v a t i o n a l v i e w o f t h - - rebound l a t c l i s h o w n i n . F i g . 1 9 a ; Fig. 20.is a rear elevation of a part of the carriage release and tabulating mechanism, certain parts havina been removed to show underlying structure; rig. 20a is a fragnientary detail in elevation of carriage return linkage of Fig. 19 arraiiged to operate a carriage This invention relat@-s to a tape coiitrolled writin 15 for traiiscribing in printed form. Withal it is the,pur-


3 its associated operating mechanism, the view being along the clutch axis; Fig. 23 is a rear plan view of the tabulating mechanism showing the parts in one position of operation; Fig. 24 is a rear plan view of the tabulating mechanism shown in Fig. 23, but showing the parts thereof in a different position of operation; Fig. 25 is a vertical section transversely of the platen carriage of the writin- machine, including tabulating key linkage and power me@hanism; Fig. 26 shows a tabulating release lever latch and its associated operating linkage; Fig. 27 is a plan view of the tabulating mechanism shown in Fig. 23; Fig. 28 is a plan view of the tabulating mechanism shown in Fig. 24; Fi-. 29 is a top plan view of a code s--Iector mechanism and associated code selector contacts; Fig. 30 is a longitudinal sectional view through the code selector mechanism on line 30-30 of Fig. 29 showing one of the selector slides; Fig. 31 is a view similar to that of Fig. 30 showing, however, a section on line 31-31; Fig. 32 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view through selector mechanism indicating its'relationship to code selectina contacts; Fig. 33 is an axial sectioral view through an electromagnetic clutch used in connection with the tape punch and the translatin.@ unit forming a part of the invention; Fig. 34 is a transverse vertical section oia line 34-34 of Fig. 33; Fig. 35 is a longitlidinal view in elevation through the tape punch forming part of the invention, some portions being shown in section; Fig. 36 is a top plan view of the tape punch shown in Fig. 35; Fig. 37 is a detail view of the punch control niechanism; Fig. 38 is a detail view of the tape feeding mechanism constituting part of the punch unit; Fig. 39 is a detail view of certain of the punch mechanism; Fig. 40 is an elevational view of the tape reading mechanism; Fig. 41 is a sectional view on line 41-41 of Fig. 40; Fi@-. 42 is a detail view of the control rnechanism for the tape reading pins and associated mechanism; Fig. 43 is a detau view of the niechanism for feeding tape through the tape readet; Fig. 44 is a front elevational view along the axis of the .code translator forming a part of this invention; Fi@-. 45 is a top plan view of the mechanism shown in Fig. 44, portions being shown in section; Fig. 46 is an end elevational vi.ew of the code translating unit- Fig. 47 is a detail view of the translator drive and its magnetic clutch control; Fig. 48 is a transverse sectional view through th6 code- translator; Fig. 49 is a detail view showing code bar restoring mechanism; Fig. 50 is a keyboard layout diagram; Figs. 51 and 51a together constitute the electrical controf circuits; and Figs. 52 and 52a illustrate a control tape havin-, code- perforations punched therein. In order to render the detailed description of the mechanism hereiii easier of understanding it is perhaps appro-priate to first describe in a rather general way the structure and function of the machine. General The machine is assembled around a four-sided base 10 which supports a power frame assembly 12, a code selector 13, a tape punch 15, a tape reader 16 and a code translator 14. An electric motor 17 is adapted to drive a power shaft 19 from which power is transmitted through gears 22 and 23 to the tape punch 15. A chain 20 transmits Dower to a power roller 21 from which the tv , pe actioii i s operated. A gear 24 on the end of the power roll shaft transmits rotary rnotion through a -ear 25 from which the tape reader 16 is driven. Gears 26 supply power to the code tralislating unit 14. A die-cast power frame 39 is mounted within the base casting. Assembled on the power frame are the key 2,700,446 4 levers 27 and the power operated type actions comprising levers 34, 35, 36, 45 and 46. Each key lever 27 is operable to control an associated power cam 31 with a mil@ imum of efrort. A normally energized magnetic lock 28 is prov;ded for the keyboard to preveit effective opcratio-@i of the keys when the power is off or when the keys should not be operated for any other reason. Each key lever 27 controls a cam assembly 12 coacting with a constantlv runnin- power roll 21. Each cam 31 10 furnishes the power for operating a type bar 36 through a beU crank arrangement consisting of levers 34, 35, and toggle 45-46. The cam also operates a slide of a code selector meelianism 13 when reqi-iired. The extent of movement imparted to each type bar 36 by its associated 15 cam 31 is variable by a turnbuckle adjusting arrangement 44 so that exactly the right printing iinpression may be obtained for each character. A selection bet,,veen upper and lower case printing is effected by shifting the type basket 52 as shown in Figs. 20 4 through 7 of the drawings. A key lever 67 and its- associated cam is provided for shifting the basket to upper case position, and a separate key lever 73 and its associated cam is provided for shifting the basket to the lower case position. This provides positive, fast, auto@ 25 matic operation of the case shift mechanism by the code translator as will be mol-c specifically pointed out hereinafter. Two oppositely arranged . toggle mechanisms cori,sisting of levers 56, 53, 59 and 69 (Figs. 4 and 6) adjustably hold the basket in its two shifted positions, and@ 30 the power from each of the shifting cams is applied to move the basket by brealcin- . its associated toggle. This results in an easy, accelerated motion of the basket, which greatly reduces power roll wear, and makes . the shifting peration so fast that in automatic operation the tape 35 roeader does not have to be delayed during case shifting movement. In Fi-s. 8 through 10 there is illustratcd an atitomatic ribbon 'shift mechanism wherein depression of a color shift key 94 onerates a key lever 95 to render operative 40 an assocaited c-am unit so that the ribbon may be shifted from one field to another by power operating from the power roller 21 through a linkage system including the levers 90, 92 and 93. All spacing movements of the carriage are controllcd 45 by letter spacing mechanism shown in general in Fig. 14 of the drawings. 'nis includes a rotary ra,tchet wheel 136 which is operated by the segment universal bar 138. For producing proportional letter spacing, three differentially connected escapement wheels 130,,131 and 132 are used in combinations to provide from one to six units of spacing. The selection of the proper combination of operations of the three wheels is made for cacti char-, acter by three magriets EMI, EMZ and EM3 (Figs. 2, 14 and 15) under control of the code selector 13. Three contacts ECA, ECB and ECC (#ig. 29) on the code selector control the low' er case spacing, and three' other contacts ECD, ECE and ECF control the upper case spacin.-. Case shift contacts CSC (Fi@-. 4) operated by the type basket select which of the two groups of - three 61) contacts are effective to control the three magnets. A friction clutch. (Fig. 22) operated by a toggle mechanism consisting of levers 201, 202, 210 and 211 controls return of the carriage. The platen is line s@t)aced as it is 65 returned under control of the clutch. The toggle linkage for operating the clutch is straightened by a carriage return cam which is controlled by a key lever. At the end of the carriage return movement, a carria,-e margin stop engages and moves a stop lever 189 on the frame (Fig. 19) wbich in turn t-ips a cam lever to furnish the 70 po-,ver for disengagin,a the cllitch by breaking the toggle. The code selector Linit 13 comprises a rectangi-ilar frame (Fig. 29) wlii-,h carries coded slides 261- Pnd 262 @vhich are operated by downward extensions 264 of th6 cam units 12. There is o ne slide for each of the cam 75 units, the slides 261 for the front row of cams movin.forwardly, and the slides 262 for the rear row of cams moving rearwardly. The forwardly movin.- slides 261 are interspaced with the r-,arwardly movi-@ig slides 262. and q, s;ngle return siorin@ 272 between ad-acent pairs 80 of slides normally holds 'the slides against a common stop bar 269. Provislop is - made for pivotally mounting thirteen bails 274 transversely across the slides, there being seven bails in a lower row and six bails in an,upper row (Figs. 30, 31 and 32). Each slide 261-'.)62 may,be 85 provided with a cam portion.285,for operating, each of


21700,446 t-he thirteen bails, but certain of these cam portions are reinoved as shown in dott,-d I-nes in Fig. 30 so that only the bails involved in the co-'-- for each particular slide are operated by the movilig c-)f that slide; thus, all slides 261-262 are different, because of the removal of differ- 5 ent combinations of the can portions 285. The bails 274 are contlected to companion con'Lact op- erating shafts 280 which carry actuators for operating associated contacts SC1 through SC6 and SCC mounted on a plate 282 (Fig. 29). S;x of the lower row of bails 10 SBI through SB6 and their associated contacts SCI through SC6 select a sLx unit code and control the pi7i-iieh- ing of the selected code in a tape. The seventh baii SBC controls the contact SCC which is cornipon -to the code selecting contacts. The upper row of six bails 286a 16 through 286f and their associated contacts ECA through ECF are used for selecting the unit spacing of the car- i-iage for securing proportional letter spacing. The bails 286a' 286b arid 286c control the letter spacing for lower case printilig while bails 2$6d, 286e and 286f control the 20 letter spacing for upper case printing. The rear portioi-i of the code selector assembly 13 is pivotally mounted on a cross-shaft 266a carried by the main frame 10, and the front end is held to the main frame by screws extending through lugs 266b. This per- 25 mits the selector unit to swing away fro.-n the power roll about the shaft 266a, and, in doing so, the contacts luounted on the plate 282 are not disturbed. The selector unit 13 may be completely removed from the machine by removing th.- pivot shaft 266a. 30 The tapc puuch -15, driven from the power shaft 19, through gears 22 and 23, is removably moiinted at the left hand rear portion of the main frame 10. A normally stationary rotary shaft 31S (Fig. 35) makes one revolu- tion under control of a magnetically operated clutch for 35 each puiich cycle (Figs. 33 and 34). The tape to be pur@ched is obtained from a suiply spool 316 removably mounted at the rear of the machine. The tape passes over the top ot. thepunch unit, aiid the holes are punched i,ipwardly at the front of the unit for convenient rnanipu- 40 lation and observation of the tape by the operator. The ,ape is fed for spar-ing of ,he holes by a pin wheel 331 during each ptiiich cycl(-, but the i)in wheel may be manu- Eilly turned to niove the tape in either direction. The tape may be easily inserted edgewise into the punch 45 block 319 (Fig. 37). The selector contacts SC-t through SC6 and SCC de- termine the code holes to be punched in the tape by en- ergizing the associpted ones of six code magdets PMI through PM6, which, by attracling their armatures 351 release associated punch lever latches 342 (Fig. 37). 'fhe punch clutch magriet is jointly controlled by a con- tact op-rated by the release of any ore or more of these latches, and by the coi-ilmoi selector contact SCC. Dui-- ing the initial rotalio.-i of the punch shaft 315, the latches Nvhich were released are locked in their released Dosition and the ones ivllich were not released are locked%m their normal position by means of a locking bail 360. The punches CPI-CP6 (Fig. 37) are each operated up- wardly throi-,,-I-l the paper tape by an associated ptiiich lever 322 pivotally r@io@,intecl bet,@veen its ends on a shaft 323. The shaf, 323 is i)ositively raised and lowered dtiring the ptinch cycle by idenl,ical cams 335 and 336 at each end o.' the shaft 32:1). Tile front end of each punch lever 322 is connected to its punch CP, and the rear end of each lever coacts @vith an associated latch 353. -When the latch 353 is released, dlie to energization of its code magnet PM, the rear end of the pulich lever is restrained from moving upwardly so that upward movement of the operating shaft -0 323 forces the punch -Lhrough th-. paper. However, when a latch is not released because its code niagnot PM was iiot energized, the rear end of the punch lever 322 is free to move i-,pwa-@,ily, thereby allowing the front end of th- ]over and its punch to remain s-Eationary while the oper- 5 atin.- shaft 323 nio@res iipwardly. The cams 335 and 336 are arran.-ed to qu-'@ckly and positively withdraw the punches from the pap-.r -,tfter a punching operation, and, dlirilig this part of the cvcle, the latches 342 are niechanically restored to their normal position and the ariiiattires So are forcibly moved a,,@lay froni their code magnets. At the end of the punciiing cycie, a feed pawl 367 operated bv a cam 363 (F@@'g. 38) operates a ratchet wheel 372 on tfie pin wheel sha I t to feed the tape one space. The tape reader 16 is mounted at the left hand side of 85 the main franie 10 at a point directly in front of the tape punch 15. The tape reading unit has a continuously operating cam shaft 453 (Fi@-. 40) and its reading operation is controlled by a niagiiet DCR, which when energized, allows a roller 433 to follow the rise and fall of a cani 434, but when deenergized, holds the roller 433 from following the cam. The cam and roller control movement of code sensing pins 439 under the relatively light pressure of a spring 442 associated with each reading pin. The tape which has been prepared in the tape punch 15 is ;nsert-.ci edgewise into the reading 'Lhroat 441 of the tape reader 16, aiid, during- operation, the tape is fed by a pin wheel 455 intermittently past the sensin- pins 439. The pin wh.-el 455 may also be turned manually to move the tape eith-.r forwardly or backwardly. Each sensing pin 439 is connected to a pivoted interposer 428 (Fig. 42). The cam 434 operates on an interposer bail arm 432 to control the movement of all of the interposers 423 and, in ttirii, allows all of th,- pins 439 to move agains'@ the tape when in nioveinent an interposer bail 431 is rock,-d out of contact @@jith the interposers 428. The pins 439 as previously mentioned are urged toward the t-,ipe by light springs 442 so that the motion of a pin will be stopped by the 'Lape, but this motion will contiwae, if there is a hole in the t4,ue opposite the pin. As the interposers 428 and the sensing pins 439 move toward the tape, contact ,irms 417 are allowed by the interposer bails to move toward the interi)osers in a direction at right angles to the direction of -movenient of the interposers. These contact arl-ns 4i7 are operated by the force of their respective contact springs 416, and if the motion of the interposer is stopped by its associated pin engaging the tape, the contac;t arm 417 is in turn stopp.-d by engaging the interposer. However, if the pir@ passes through a hole in the tap@-, the interpos-.r moves out of the path of travel of the contael arm, allowing the contact to operate effectively. The interposer bail 431 is then positively rocked by its cam 434 to first restore all the contact 1.2vers 417 and then riove the interposers and v,.ns away from the tape to nornial position. As soon as the pins are withdrawn clear of the tap@-, a spring-opei- ated feed pawl 458 (Fig. 43) moves the ratchet wheel shaft 456 'lo feed the tape one space. A ieed cam 463 positively returns the fced pawl, and a latch 468 allows an effective feeding movei-nent of the pawl 458 only when the interposer bail 431 operates. This prevents feeding of the tape when the previously inentioned control magnet DCR 's deenergized. The arran.-enent of the conta'ct ari-.is 417 operating at right angles to the interposers 428, allows a heavy contact load to be controlled by each pin and yet retain a light pressure of the pin a.-ai-Tist the tape. Thus, a group of any niii-nber and arran@eme:it of contacts iequired may be controlled by each code hole in the tape, and yet the tape inay b@- rtin through the reader an indefir@ite iiimb-,r of tinies without damage by the p-Ins. Tlle contacts of the tape reader 16 control the translating unit 14 in its selection of the key levers that are to be opeiated. The cam shaft 492 of the translating tinit is driven @@ron-i the gear wheels 26 and it is iinder 'Lhe control of a one-revolutio-,i nlagrietic clutch 539. The unit is removably mounted be-@icath the keyboard of the writing 1- nachine. Ttic clutch control ma-net is e-tiergized y a- coi-,in-loii reader co@itact RCC. The speed of the transiatcr shaf, 492 is the same ,)s ,he speed of the reader shlft 456, and althol-igli the translator cl-,itch 539 is a single- revolution clitch, th@- eii,-rgization of the clutch magnet by the reader is so timed that the translator shaft rotates continuoiisiy wliil,- the reader is operating continuously. The transla'or operates the key levers by vertically disposed seek@rs 489 (Fig. 48), each seeker being operably connected to one of the key levers. The seekers are mounted for both a horizontal pivoted motion for selection aild a vertical sliding motion for key lever operation. The selection of the proper one of the seekers 489 is determi@ied by six i)ermutatioi bars PBl, PB2, PB3, PB4, PB5 and PB6 which are mounted for horizontal sliding motion transversely of all the seekers 439. Each permutation bar is di,,Ter,-ntly notched (Fig. 45) opposite the seekers 489 so that for any combination of positions of the six bars PBI-PB6, only one seeker will be allowed


-2,700,44-,6 .7 to move forwardly into a position to be operated down- wardly by a seeker operating bail 533 and in turn operate its key lever. Each permutation bar is operated by a spring 502 from its normal position upon energization of a corresponding magnet TM controfled by the reader con- 5 tacts RCI-RC6. In addition to the seeker operating bail, a cam operated seeker restoring bail 523 (Figs. 44 and 48) is - provided for controlling the pivotal motion of all the seekers into and out of cooperative relation with the permutation 10 bars. Another cam 493 (Fig. 49) operates a - permuta- tion bar restoring bail 512. When the pe@-mutation bars are restored, the downwardly projecting li-,gs 50i rock armature knock-off bails 540 and force the armatiires 509 away from the permutation bar magnets. 15 Power frame and type actioiz The machine is assembled around a sturdy four-sided base 10 formed by a right and left aluminum casting joined at the front by another aluminum casting and 20 at the rear by an angular steel plate 11 extending over the top rear portions of the side castings to brace the entire assembly. A power frame assembly 12, a code - selector 13 and a code translator 14 are mounted between the two side castings. A tape punch 15 and a tape reader 2.5 16 are mounted on the left hand side of the frame. A carriage and rail assembly is mounted between the top rear portions of the two side castings, and a space at ',he rear of the carriage is provided for au,,@iliary apparatus. A single, constant speed '/L?o h. p. motor 17 is mounted 30 on the inner face of the rear frame plate 11, and this motor is connected by a V-belt 18 to the power shaft. Power shaft 19 is connected by means of a chain drive 20 to a continuously rotating power roll 21 which is adapted to operate the type bars through a conventional 35 cam arrangement as will be more fully pointed out. The motor 17 is also connected to drive the tape punch 15, the tae)e reader 16 and the -translating mechanism 14. This d7rive is achieved through a series of -ears as - follows. The power shaft 19 through gear 22 drives a gear 23 on 4( the drive shaft of the reader. A gear 24 fixed to the power roll shaft is in contact with a gear 25 on the drive shaft of the tape reader 16. A pair of -.ears 26 imparts driving power to the code translator mechanism 14. The individual gears for drivin.- each of these units not only 45 afford the proper relative speeds, but also permit easy removal of each unit fi-om the base. The power frame 12 which is mount6d within the base 10 has assembled thereon the key levers 27 and the power operated 'Lype actions. The key levers 27 are - operable to control their associated power cams with a n-tini-nium of effort. The manner in which the operating cams are energized by the power roll 21 will appear more fully hereinafter. A normally energized magnetic lock 28 adapted to rock a key lever locking bail 29 (see Fig. 3) is provided to prevent effective operation of the keys when the power for any reason is off, or when the keys should not be operated for any other reason. Each key lever controls a cam assembly contacting with the constantly running power roll 21 -,vhereby each lever control cam fumishes the power for operating a type bar 60 through a bell crank and, in addition, operates a slide of the code selector mechanism 13. The manner in Nvhich power is imparted to the oper- ative mechanism of the machine will be only briefly de- - scribed since the arrangement is generally shown in the 6,) International electric writing macbire formerly known as the "Electromatic." It is in connection with - electric writing machines of this type that the invention has been disclosed. However, it will be uriderstood that the in- , vention is not limited in application to the specific ma- 0 chine selected for purpose of illustration, but may be applied to other power operated writing machines. As shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings the key levers '@17 are pivoted on a rod 30 whicli is supported by a cross member of the power frame asserilbly. The power roller 75 21 is mounted under the pow6r frame assembly for rota- tion in the direction of the arrow (Fig. 3) by means of the drive connections to the motor previously descr,.bed. Cooperating with the power roll 21 are cam units 31 which are pivotally mcilinted on rods 32 extendin- -oarallel 80 with the power roller 21. There is a cam unit 31 asso- ciated with each key lever 27 and each carn -Linit in con- trol of. a type bar is connected by a link 33 with a bell 6rank 34 pivoted on rod 30. The bell cranks 34 are connected@by links 35 to the type bars 36 through the a5 medium of toggles 37. The type bars 36 are pivoted on the usual wi@e segment 38 provided on a type bar segment 39 located in front of the conventional platen. The platen, as will appear hereinafl,er, is rotatably mounted in a carriage which is supported on front and rear rails by means of suitable anti-friction roller trucks. '%Nhen any character key 40 is depressed, its cam unit 31 is caused to operably engage the power roller 21 in a well known way, thereby rocking the cam unit 31 clockwise or counterclockwise, according to whether the operative cam unit is pivoted on the left or on '@he right hand rod 32, respect,'.Vely. The rocking of the cam unit cau@es its link 33 to be drawn downwardly, thereby rocking the corresponding bell crank 34. This movement of the bell crank 34, through the corresponding link 35 and toggle 37, causes type bar 36 associated with the selected key to rock in a printing stroke and to make an impression of the type ui)on a work sheet carried about the platen. The type b@r, near the end of its operative stroke, en-ages @he usual universal bar 41 and causes the same to rock. It may be pointed out that the operating linkage for the type bars 36 which has just been described includes several novel features which render the linkage system adjustable to secure an optimum and a uniform impression of the type. In Fig. 3 of the drawings, it wfll be noted that the downwardly depending link 42 is connected to its cam assembly 31 at the forward or keyboard side of the power roll by means of a turnbuckle 43, which is pivoted at one end to the link 42 and which is- adjustably threaded at its other end into a socket 44 in the horizontal leg of the cam unit frame. The links depending downwardly from the bell cranks 34 are composed of two sectioias which are screwed into each other, thereby providing an adjustment by means of which the associated cams may be accurately spaced with respect to the power roll. It will appear, therefore, that the leverage asserted through the link and the cam unit may be adjusted through the turnbuckle 43. It may also be pointed out that the toggle 37 consisting of arms 45 and 46 is so arranged as to effectively inhibit rebound action of the type bars 36. One end of the arm 45 of the toggle is mounted on a a-ed pivot rod 47, while the other end is pivoted to the arm 46 by means of a pivot pin 48. The op-@rative connection of the arm 46 of the toggle to the type bar 36 is at a pivot pin 49. The operation of the toggle mechanism is stabilized by a spring 50 which is attached to the to.-gle arm 46 at one of its ends and to a fixed frame member at its other end. It will be obser-ved that when the toggle link-age 45-46 is in its ext@nded position the points 47, 48 and 49 are in a substantially straight line so that upon return of the type bar 36 to its position of rest, as shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings, the toggle linkage will in effect constitute a lock against the rebound actio-ti of the type bar 36. A fine adjustment of the toggle linkage may be obtailied by either sli,-htly shortening the arm 45 or by lengthed- ing it. Such alteration of the arm 45 is easily achieved by either springing apart, or closing a pair of ears 51 which constitute the legs of a generally U-shaped portion of the arm 45. Case sh if t The type basket 52, see Figs. 4, 5, 6 and 7, is mounted for selective shifting between upper and lower case printin- positions by mounting the same on two sets of parallel' leaf springs in the well known manner. For the purpose of shifting the type basket, there has been provided herein improved power operated mechanism. A key lever and cam assembly is provided for shifting the basket to one position, and a separate key lever and cam assembly is provided for shifting it to the other position. This provides positive, fast, automatic operation of the type basket shift for selectively printing upper or lower case characters under the control of the code translator mechanism 14. Two oppositely disposed toggle mecha--qisms adjustably hold the basket in its two shifted positions, and the power from each basket shift cam unft is applied to move the basket by breaking its associated toggle. This imparts an easy, accelerated motion to the basket. Specifically, the manner in which the type basket is shifted from one position to another will be seen by reference to Figs. 4-7, wberein Figs. 4 and 5 illustrate the shiftin.- mechanism at the left side of the type basket and Figs. 6 and 7 illustrate the shifting mechanism at the right side of the basket. Furthermore, Figs. 4 and 7 show the position of the shifting mechanism at the left


9 and,@ right side of the basket, respectively, when the basket has been nioved upwardly. for printing lower case characters, while Figs. 5 and, 6 show the position of the mechanism at the left and rj:6ht side, respectively, when the basket has been moved downwardly for printing of 6 upper case characters. A lower case key LCI is disposed at:the right hand side of the keyboard, and depressior of this, key will operate a cam ass,-mbly as will be pointed otit@hereinafter. The key LCI is connected by means of a transverse bail 53 (Fig. 3) with a lower case shift key 10 I,C2 disposed at the left hand side of the keyboard. An upper@ case shift@ key UC1 is disposed at the left hand side of.tbe-keyboard and depression of this key will operate aii associated cam assembly, as will be pointed out here- inafter. The upper case shift key UCI is attached to an 15 upper case shift UC2 which is disposed at the right hand side of the keyboard by means of a transverse bafl 54. It will appear, therefore, that depression of either of the case shift keys LCI or LC2 on the one hand or UCI or UC2 on the other hand will effect a shifting move- 20 ment of the type basket. Fig. 4 of the drawings shows the type basket 52 in its upper position in which lower case. characters are print- ed. To the rear face of a side. frame member of the basket 52 is attached a bracket by means of a pair of 25 screws, and to th-- bra-,ket 55 are pivoted three toggle levers 56, 58 and 59. One end of the toggle lever 56 is pivoted on a shaft 60 while the other eiid is pivoted to the lever 59 at an intermediate point thereof by means of a pivot pin 61. The free end of the lever 59 has a 30 stud 62 extending from a f ace thereof to whicli is at- tached, a spring 63 which is ancliored at its other end to a fixed frame member. The other end of the lever 59 is pivoted to the bracket 55 by means of a pivot pin 59a. The lever 58 of the toggle system has one end thereof pivoted on a pivot pin 64 carried by the bracket 55 ' The opposite end of the arm 58 is pivoted to a short lever 65 by means of@ a pivot pin 66, the short lever 65 being se- cured to a rock shaft 67. The toggle system as it is disposed in Fig. 4, when tne 40 type basket is elevated to its lower case position, has the pivot points 59a, 60 and 61 of the toggle system in sub- stantial alignment and the spring, 63 under substantial tension, and is effective to exert considerable turning force on finger 70 which holds the toggle arms 59 and 56 in e,@i their straightered relation, as shown in Fig. 4, wherein @rT 56 engages the fin.aer 70 of the release lever 69 which is in turn stopped by extension 71 and stop 72. This positively holds the basket in its upper position. Th@, arrangement at the other side of the basket has a like 5 function. In order to release the basket 52 to its lower position for the printing of upper case characters, it is rnerely necessary to depress either key UCI or UC2 to rock the key lever 67 about the rod 30, whereby its associated cam assembly is brought into contact with the power roll 21 and a connecting link 68 is thereby drawn downward- ly. A toggle release lever 69 is vivoted for rocling rnovement about the rock shaft 60 aid the upper free end of the release lever 69 has an inturned finger 70 which 60 abuts the edge of the lever 56 to rock the same in a cloclc@,vise direction to break the toggle linka@-e into the position shown in Fig. 5 of the drawings. The release 0 COD- lever 69 has an extension 71- which is adapted t tact a stop member 72 when the release lever and its 65 associated cam assembly are in normal or non-operated position. As viewed in Fig. 5 of the drawings the case shift toggle linkage is in its released position wherein the force of the spriiig 63 is directed along a line from its point of 70 anchorage 62 through the pivot point 59a of the lever 59. in this position the efj'ect of the spring is substantially rieutralized. When the type basket is in its upper ca:se position, the operating toggle at the right hand side of the basket 7.5 is as shown in Fig. 6 of the drawings, while its posi- tion at that side of the basket for lower case printing is shown in Fig. 7 of the drawings. The tog.-le linkage at the right side of the basket which controls the shift- ing of the basket into 'Lhe lower case position is in all 80 respects similar to the shifting mecha-@iism at the left hand side of the basket with the exception that the posi- tion of the lever 59 is reversed. That is to say, the pivot point 59a is disposed at the bottom edge of the bracket 55 while the free end of the lever 59 extends 83 t,700)446 10 upwardly when the toggle system is ini its extended' or operative positioni If, therefore, the basket is in its tipper case position and it is desired to shift the same to lower case position, it is merely necessary to depress the lower case shift key LCI and its associated key ]ever 73 to rock the lev.-r downwardly about the rod 30@ This wi,'! effectively release its cam assembly for contact with 'Lhe power roll 21 with the result that the link 68 is moved downwardly and the release lever 69 will be rocked into contacl, with the toggle lever 56 so that the toggle system will be broken into the position shown in Fig. 7 of the drawings where the force of the spring 63 extends substantially from its point of connection 62 with the lever 59 through the pivot point 59a whereby, iis citect on the toggle linkage is substantially nullified. The type basket 52 has lu.-S 74 extending forwardly fropi each side thereof, and these lugs carry stop screws 75 on ,vhich stop nuts 76 are threaded. The stop nut 76 at the left side of the basket is adapted in its upper case position to contact the face of a stop bar 77 fixed to and extending forwardly from a portion of the power frame. The stop nut 76; at the right hand side of the basket is adapted in its lower case position to contact the lower face of the stop bar 77 at the right hand side of the basket. The movement of the type. basket 52 niay, therefore, be accurately limited by adjusting the stop ri-uts 76, the one at the left hand side of the basket for limiting downward movement of the basket a@id the one at the right hand sid6 of the basket for limiting up-,N,ard movement of the basket. When one set of toggles is operated to shift the basket a siight compression force is exerted on the stop members 75-76 (Fig, 7) at the opposite side of the basket. Tiius, the force applied at one side of the machine is resisted to some extent at the other side This is effective to take up all the play that may @e in pivots 64, 66 and in the bearings of rock shaft 67. T@e importance of the foregoing case shift control lies in the fact that the toggle linkage system is brokeii -by power roll energy, whereby a mechanical advantage is realized and wear on the power roll is minimized. Furthermore, the movement of the type basket is rapid and positive under the influence of the breaking of the toggle linkare and the spring 63. Ribboiz sliift In order that the ribbon field or color niay be shifted dtiring automatic tape controlled operation of the machine, as to be pointed out hereinafter, there has been provided means herein for shifting the fabric ribbon by means of a key lever controlled cam. In this regard attention is d@"rected to Figs. 8, 9 and 10 of the drawiilgs. The machine is provided with conventional ribbon sh;ft rn-.chanism, but this mechanism has been placed und6r the influen-,e of power cam mechanism. In Figs. 8, 9 and 10 a shaft 78 which is mounted for rockihg motio-P in the power frame elements 79 and 80 is the shaft which is manually rocked in conventional writing machines- f6,r effecting color change or field shift of the writing ribbon. To the outer end of the shaft 78 has been fixed a rocker plate 81 which carries a control plate 32 in spaced relation in respect to the outer face thereof. Spacing pins 83 and 84 mount the control plate 82 in fixed relation to the rocker plate 81. The control plate 82 has a pair of forwardly extending diver-ing fiiigers 85 and 86, which serve to anchor one end of a'pair of springs 87 and 88, the opposite ends of these springs beitig anchored at a common point in a laterally extendinlug 89 carried by a lever 90. The rear end 91 of the' lever 90 is T-shaped so that opposite ends of the T abut the spacing pins 83 and 84, respectively, dependin@ on whether the lever 90 is shifted to a-@i upp-@r or a lowe'r position under the influence of springs 87 or 88, respectively. The forward end of the lever 90 is pivoted to an operating lever 92 which in turn is motinted for rocking movement on the rod 30. The other end of the lever 92 is connected by ineans of a link 93 to a cam @@7nit qdjq.-,ciit the power roll 21. It will follow, therefore, that upoi-@ depression of the color shift key 94 and i's related key lever 95 which is pivoted for rocking mover.-,eiit oil the shaft 30, the associated cam unit will be releascd into eiiga.-err-ent with the Dower roll 21, the cam tinit will be rocked about the rod 32, and the link 94 will be operated to rock-@ the lev-er 92 in a counterclockwise direc-


2-2700,446 tion, thereby pulling forward on the lever 90 and applying operating force to either spacing pin 83 or spacing pin 84 depending on the position of the T-shaped end 91 at the time. Assuming the rocker plate 31 to be disposed in the position shown in Fig. 8 of the drawings, the T-shaped end 91 of the lever 90 will engage the spacing pin 83 under the influence of spring 87. When the lever 90 is pulled forwardly as described, the T-shaped end thereof will urge the rocker plate 81 in a counterclockwise direction. A limited movement of the rocker plate 81 will cause the same to snap into its shifted position because of an overcenter spring 96 which Muences its action. The spring 96 has one end thereof mounted on a fixed bracket 97 and the other end thereof on an arm 98 which is fixed to the shaft 78. When the rocker plate 81 is shifted in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 8, the sprin.- 88 will shift the T-shaped end 91 of the lever 90 into contact with the spacing pin 84 so 'that it is conditioned to move the rocker plate in a clockwise direction upon a subsequent manipulation of the color shift key 94 and the operation of its associated mechanism. Fig. 9 of the drawings shows the rocker plate 81 shifted into the extreme position opposite from that shown in Fig. 8. In the position of the lever 90 as showv - in Fig. 9, its T-shaped end 91 engages the lower spacing pin 84 whereby the T-shaped end 91 is conditioned to apply clockwise ro,@king motion to the rocker plate 81. It will follow from the foregoing, therefore, that there has been provided herein simple and positive power mechanism for shifting the ribbon, and this is particularly important when it is desired to write text in rrore than one color by automatic operation of the machine under control of a record tape as to be described hereinafter. A stub shaft 99 extends laterally from a face of the rocker plate 81 to a point that is accessible from the exterior of the machine for the purpose of permitting manual manipulation of the ribbon shift mechanism. Platen indexing The writing machine platen is indexed about its longitudinal axis for the purpose of feeding the copy paper through the type impression zone by conventional mechanism which need, therefore, be only briefly described. In Figs. 11 and 12 is illustrated the mechanism by which the platen is itdexed. The platen 100 is rotatably mounted on its axis 101 and has attached to one end thereof a ratchet wheel 102 which is adapted to be engaged by a feed pawl 103 for rotating the platen. The feed pawl 103 is pivoted on a pin 104, the pin 104 being carried by a sliding supporting member. The supporting member 105 has a pair of spaced slots 106 and 107 which embrace fixed guide studs 108 and 109, respectively. A finger 110 pivoted on the carriage frame at III has its free end resting on the top edge of the feed pawl 103. The upper edge of the finger 110 has a series of notches 1, 2 and 3 representing line spaces, and Nvhen the operating lever 113 which is mounted on the pivot pin 108 is moved into one of the line space not6hes 1, 2 or 3, the free end of the finger 110 bears on the top of the feed pawl 103 and alters the relation of the feed pawl 103 in respect to the ratchet wheel 102 by moving the supporting member 105 upward or downward so as to cause the feed pawl 103 to engage either every tooth, every second tooth or every third tooth of the ratchet wheel 102 in accordance with the setting of the hand lever 113. The lower end of the suoport 105 has a laterally extend-'ng lug 114 which engages in the slotted free end of an operating le-,,er 115. The operating lever 115 is pivoted on a fixed pivot stud 116 and is normally held in its raised position by means of a spring --017 Nvhich is wound about the pivot stud 116 and has one end thereof anchored to the carriage 118 and the other end to stud 119 extending from one face of the operating lever 115. The platen indexing mechanism thus far described is operated through an indexing movement when the carriage is returned under the force of a carriage return tape 120. The end of the carriage return tape is attached to a downwardly projecting T-shaped lever 121 which is pivoted on a pivot stud 122. The studs 116 and 122 are carried by a fixed, upstanding bracket 123 sequred to the carriage 118. One arm of the T-shaped 12 lever 121 has z@ bifurcation 124 in which is received a pin 125 extending laterally from a face of the lever 115. It will appear from the foregoing, therefore, that when r the carriage is returned under the influence of the car' riage return tape 120, the T-shaped lever 121 will be rocked in a counterclockwise direction about its fixed pivot 122 with the result that the bifurcated end 124 of the lever will move downwardly, and as a consequence of the connection between the bifurcation of the lever 10 and the pin 125, the lever 115 will also be rocked downwardly, thereby draviing tne supporting member 105 downwardly to the point where the slots 106 and 107 will engage with their upper extremities with the pins 103 and 109, respectively. Thereupon, in accordance with 15 the settin- of the control lever 113, the platen will be indexed l,'2 or 3 line positions as the carriage is being returned. Vai-iable spacing 20 The machine is equipped with a standard carriage 126 (Fig. 13) and all of the spacing movements of the carriage are controlled by a rotary wheel escapement mechanism operated by the segment universal bar 41 (Fig. 3). Herein is disclosed proportional spacing mecha- 25 r,.ism whereip three differentially connected escapement wheels are used in combinations to provide from one to six units of spacina. The selection of the proper combination of operations of the three v/heets is made for each character by three magnets EMI, EM2 and EM3 (Fig. 30 2), under the coiltrol of the code selector 13. Three contacts on the code selector control the lower case spacing and three other contacts on code selector control the upper case spacing as will be pointed out hereinafter. Case shift contacts CSC operated when the type 115 basket is raised and lowered select which of the two groups of the three code selector contacts are to be effective to control the three magnets EMI, EM2 and EM3. Spacing between words and the like is controlled by dummy or non-printing type actions so that the same timin- is re- 40 tained as in printing. The carriage escapement mechaiism is designed to letter space in proportion to the width of the respective characters employed, and this mechanism is mounted in a frame casting 127 which is secured to the undersides of 45 the front and rear rails 128, 129 (Fig. 14). The frame 127 supports three wheels which are desi-nated 130, 131 and 132. A rod 133 on which the whee @Ts 130. 131 and 132 are rotatably mounted is supported in Parallel spaced frame members 134 and 135. A pinion 136 which is at- 50 tached to a pinion 137 meshes constantly with a spiral rack 138 which is secured to the underside of the carriage 118. The rear end of the pinion 136 is formed as a ball race (see Fig. 18) in cooperation with balls 139 whereby the 1;5 pinion 136 and ratchet 137 rotate or. the rod 133. The latter is relatively fixed in the frame members 134 and 135. The hub of wbeel 130 is inteizral with a Pinion 140 located adjacent the hub of the wheel 131. The piniort 60 140 meshes with one of a pair of inter-me-,bing sun pinions 141 rotatably mounted on bracket 142 carried by the w'@icel 131 while the other pinion 141 rneshes with a piniop 143 which is secured to a i)inion 144. The pinion 144 meshes v@,ith one of a similar i)air of inter- 65 meshing sun pinions 145 mounted on brackets 146 carried by wbeel 132, ,vhile the other pinion 145 ireshes with a pinion 147. Rotatably mounted on the i)inion 1,17 is a ratebet wheel 148 which is of the same diameter as the r,5itchet 137 70 while secured to the pinion 147 is a ratchet 149 which is considerably larger in diameter than the ratchets 137 and 148. The ratchets 137 and 149 are normally connected for driving purnoses by me2ns best shown in FiLs. 17 and 18, comprisin- a dog 150 pivoted on a stud 75 151 fixedly mounted on the ratchet @,vheel 149. The do@, 150 norrnally engaaes the teetb of the ratchot wlcel 137 whereby the ratel@et wheel 149 will be rot- @ited in a cou-@iterelockwise direction (Fig. 17) Vnenever the ratchet wheel 137 is s;m;iarly rotated by movement of the car- 80 riage. The dog 150 is slotted to embrace a stiid 152 carried by a member 153 also i)ivotally mounted on the stud 151. The member 153 has a lug 154 en2aaing a stud 155 secured to the side of ratchet ,vheel 148. A torsion spring 156, hooked over the end of stud 155 and 85 lyi-ng in a groove j'ormed. in, a collar 157 on t,he pinion


2,700,446 13 147 and also anchored to a stud 158 (Fig. 17) on ratchet 149, normally tends to rotate the ratchet 148 in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 17). Movement of the carriage is effected, as usual in typewriting machines, by means of a spring drum 159 partly shown in Fig. 2 on which drum is wound a tape 120a passing over a pufley 160 niounted on the rear rail 129 and thence to the right haiid end of the rack 138 at which point the tape 120a is secured. Due to the constant tension produced in the tape 120a by the spring drum 159, the carriage 126 tends to move to the left. Thus the ratchet 137 tends to rotate the ratchet 149 and pinioll 147 in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 17). This rotational tendency of the pinion 147 is comniunicated to the wheels 130, 131 and 132 (Fig. 14) through the train of connections coriprising the pinions 140, 141, 143, 144 and 145. Normally, however, this rotational tendency has no effect so far as movement of the carriage is concerned because the wheels 130, 131 and 132 are restrained from rotation by means of the loose dogs 161 (Fig. 16) of the escapement mechanism. Reverse rotation of the ratchet 149 and pinion 147 is prevented by means of a do.- 162 (Fig. 19) pivoted on a stud 163 carried by a plate 164 which is adjustably secured to the rear rail 129. Also pivoted on stud 163 is a bracket 165 having a bumper 166 composed of resilient mater;al such as leather against which the dog 162 is normally held by a spring 167. The bracket 165 is adjustably rotated on the stud 163 until the free end of said do@ 162 engages one wall of a tooth in the ratchet 149 but ' does not qtiite touch the other wall of the adjacent tooth, the object being to silence the clicking noise which ordinarily is experienced with similar ratchet-and-pawl- mechanisms diic to the end ol@' the dog striking the side of the next succeeding tooth after riding over a given tooth. The ratchet wheels 130, 131 and 132 have 54, 54 and 36 teeth, respectively, whereby the amount of feeding movement imparted to the carriage may be varied. Due to the method ol' interconnecting the ratchet wheels by means of intermeshing pinions, the ratchet wheels 130 and 132 rotate in a direction opposite to the ratchet 131. Asstiming for the moment that the ratchet wheels 130 and 131 (Fi.-s. 14 and 15) are fixed against rotatioii, the pinion 144 will be locked against rotation. Therefore, if ratchet wheel 132 is now permitted to rotate oiie tooth sppce, one of the pinions 145 will roll around said pinion 144 and by rotating the companion pinion 144 will permit the pinion 147 to rotate in the same direction as the ratchet wheel 132 but twice as much as ralchet wheel 132. Similarly, if the ratchet wheels 130 and 132 are locked against rotation and the ratchet wheel 131 is permitted to move, one of the pinions 141 will roll around the pinion 140 and cause pinions 143 and 144 to be rotated. The rotation of pinion 144 is communicated to pinion 147 through the intermeshing pinions 145. As in the case of ratchet wheel 140, pinion 147 rotates twice as much as ratchet i@,heel 131. However, when the ratchet wheels 131 and 132 are held against rotation and ratchet wheel 130 rotates, the same amount of movement will be communicated from the ratchet ivheel 130 to the pinion 147 through the pinions 141, 143, 144 and 145 acting as idlers. It is possible, however, to permit the ratchet wheels 130, 131 and 132 to rotate in combinations to produce an accumulative effect upon the pinion 136 whic'.i, of course, will permit the carriage to move correspondingly. Since the ratchet wheel 130 has fifty-four teeth, the pinion 147 and hence the pinion 136 will be rotated 1/54 of a revolution whenever the ratchet wheel 130 rotates one tooth space. Moreover, since the movement of the pinion 147 is twice that of the ratchet wheel 131 and the latter has fifty-four teeth, the pinions 147 and 136 will be rotated the eqi-iivalent Of 1/27 of a revolution of the ratchet wheel 131. Likewise, the ratchet wheel 132 having thirtysix teeth, pinions 147 and 136 will be rotated 1/36 of a revolution of the ratchet wheel 132. It will be seen, therefore, that the movements of pinions 147 and 136 produced by the ratchet wheels 130, 131 and 132 are so designed and the spacing of the teeth on their ratchet Nvheels has been so selected that ratchet wheel 130 causes the carriage to move one unit of spacing, ratchet wheel 131 two units of spacing and ratchet wheel 132 three units of spacing. It is thus possible to secure six different spacings of the carriage which, in terms of units of carriage spacing, are as follows: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. Tlius the spacing of the carriage can be accommodated to the different widths 14 of letters employed. 'ne means by which the wheeis i@6, 131 and 132 are select:@vely co,-@trolled will be described iii the following paragraphs. The rotation of the escapenient ratchet wheels 130, 131 r) and 132 is controlled by nieans of three dog rocker mechaiiisms which are selectively controlled by magnets EMI, EM2, and EM3, respectively. Figitre 16 shows the dog rocker mechanisr@i for the ratchet wheel 131. Each dog rocker mechanism includes a dog rocker plate 195 which 10 is pivotally mounted on vertically aligned conical sttids 196 screwed into threaded holes in two parallel and horizontal portions 197 of the frame 127. The conical points ef the studs are seated in conical holes in lugs formed in the dog rocker plate 195. Pivoted on a stud 198 carried 15 by the rocker plate 195 is the usual loose escapement dog 161 mentioned hereinbefore wllich is actuated by a snring 199 so as to be urged in a counterclockwise dire-etion (Fig. 16). The left hand end of the dog 161 e-@igaging one of the teeth of the ratchet 131, however, is held in the 20 position of Fig. 16 owin- to the tension of the spring drum 159 (Fig. 14) being greater than the tension of the spring 199 (Fig. 16) wbereby the dog 161 is forced against a stop 200 mounted on an arm 201 which is rotatably secured to the side of the rocker plate 195 by ineans of 25 the stud 198. Th-. upper left hand portion of the arm 201 is provided with a bent- over lug against which bears an adjusting screw 202 carried by a lug formed in the rocker plate 195. By turiiing the screw 202 in one direction or another, the arm 201 n-iay be rotatably adjusted 30 about the stud 198 as a pivot. The dog rocker plate 195 is provided with a lug 203 which is substantially in horizontal alignment with the left end of the dog 161 but does not iiormally enga.-c the teeth of the ratchet wheel 131. When the rocker plate 195 is rocked in a counterclock- 35 wise direction (Fig. 14), the lug 203 is moved into the tooth space occupied by the dog 161 before said dog is moved free of the ratchet wheel whereby when the dog ultimately clears teeth in the ratchet 131, the ratchet wheel is permitted to rotate cotinterelockwise a fraction 40 of a tooth space in Fig. 16. The spring 199 theti rocks the dog 161 in a counterclockwise direction until said dog strikes a resilient stop 204 mounted on the arm 201. The stops 203 and 204 on arm 201 are so spaced that the end of dog 161 assumes a position in horizontal alignment 45 with the next lower tooth space of ratchet wheel 131. NVhen the plate 195 is restored to the position of Fig. 14, the end of dog 161 is moved into the path of the next lower tooth on ratchet wheel 131 before the lug 203 clears the teeth in ratchet 131. When the lug 203 finally 60 clears the teeth in ratchet 131, the ratchet wheel 131 will be permitted to rotate in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 16) the remaiiider of a tooth space, thereby bringing the end of dog 161 back against the resilient stop 203. Thus, by - iving the plate 195 one complete oscillation the 5 -5 escapement ratchet 131 is permitted to tum one full tooth space. The rocker plate 195 (Fig. 16) is fonned with a lug 205 which extends between two resilient stops 206 and 207 (Fig. 14) mounted on adjustable arms 208 and 209, fiu respectively, which arms are pivoted in scissors fashion on one of the conical studs 196. The stops 206 and 207 being located on opposite sides of the lugs' 205, adjustably limit the oscillatory movements of the plate 195 on the studs 196 as pivots. 65 Similar mechanism is provided for the other two ratchet wheels 130 and 132 but, owing to the face that these two ratchet wheels rotate in a direction opposite to the ratchet wheel 131, the rocker plates 195 for the ratchet wheels 130 and 132 are in citect inverted. Normally, the plates 70 195 are held by torsion springs 210 with their lugs 205 abutting the stops 207, as shown in Fig. 14, with all of the dogs 161 engaging the teeth of their respective ratenets. The rocker plates 195 are selectively and combina- 75 tionally,operated through power mechanism controlled by the keys 40 and the code selector mechanism 13 which will be described at a later point in this specification. Ma7iual carriage release 80 It is desirable to be able to release the escapement mechanism from the carriage for the purpose of moving the carriage by hand, or when the carriage is to be returned by the usual power operated carriage return mechanism. For this purpose there is provided release 85 mechanism which is operated by the usual carriage release


15 levers 168, one of which is shown in Fig. 13, these levers p'@v6ted on studs '169 on the side plates of the carriage with th6 free'ends O.'L l@@vers 168 adjacent the usual platen rotat,ing knobs 170. Each lever 168 abuts one end <)f a bail 171 pivotally mounted in the side plates of the carriage. When either of the levers 168 is depressed, th, bail 171 is rocked clockviise in Fig. 13 thereby cal@s:ing the b@il to move rearwardly of the platen. A lug 172 f,ormed 'hi a lever 173 (Fig. 19), pivoted Dn the tojp -urface of the rear rail 129, is thereby moved rearwardly of the platen whenever the bail 171 is moved by the release levers 168. Mounted on a bra.-ket 174 (Fig. 19) is a lever 175 pivoted on a stud 176 carried by the bracket 174. A release dog 177 is pivoted to the lower end of the lever 175 by means of a stud 178. A spring 179, anchored to one end of the dog 177 and to a leg 180 of the bracket 174, normall[y holds a pin 181 in the outer end of said d<)g against a stop notch 182 formed in the leg; 180. Wh6never the lever 173 is moved forwarcily in Fig. 19 by the bail 171 as a consequence of the operation of one of the relea@;e levers 168, th-. d- og 177 is mov-.d to the left in Fig. 19. B@ a cloclcwise pivotal movement of lever 175 on the stud '176 and a resulting m6vement of the dog 177, the raichet 14'a is moved in a counterelockW.6e direction relative to the ratchet 149 (Fig. 19). Through the cooperati@on of the pin 155 on ratchet 148 with the lug on lever 153, and the co6peration OL pIn 152 witfi the slot in ,he dog 150, the latter is lifted out ,ol,@ engagement with tiie teeth <)f ratchet 137, thei-eby permitting said ratchet to be moved independently of the ratchet 149. Thus the carriage may be move,d by hand ,or by the power operated return mechanism without disturbing the escapement mechanism and without the escapemene mechanism interfering with the movement of the carr@'@age. Carriage i-etiirtz The do- 177 is operated automatically whenever the usual power operated return mechanism operates to return the carria,-e prior to writilig a new line. In the "Interjr@ational" electric writin.- machine, the carriage is return I ed by power mechanism very similar to one described in Pat'eDt NTo. 2,294,722 under control of a carriage return key I . This mechanism is n@ot shown in any great detail ;ii the present case, because it is not directly involved in the o,per-tion of the inve@it;on cla-'@Med hereinafter.. A long-tudinally yielding lever 139 (carried by the bracket 221) ultirr@ately controls the release of the carria@e return clutch, @@,hen a hooked end 194 of @-,tid leVCr 189 is engaged by the left ho.,nd marginal st<)p 190 carrl'ed by the usual marg' al top rack 191 moutited on the 'n carriage. Through an a,7m i92 and a link 193, which interc6n-@iects said arm 192 with the lever 173, the dog 17-7 is opera'Led to disengage the dog 150 from the ratchet 137. Diiring a carria ge return operation, the ratchet 137 I rotates iii a clockwise direction (Fig. 18) whereby, if the dog 150 were not released a clicking noise would result which is ti@-@desirable as it renders I 'Lhe operation I of the iiiachii,e noisy. W@4en the c-ar,-iag- aporoaches its left hand marginal ppsitio@i, the left hand maiginal st6p 190 strikes the hooked end i94 i th.- levei 189 an t)tills said lever 189 to the left in Fi-. 1.9 whereby ttie li@-ikage systeni and its associated ca'm is operated to disengage the carrla_,6 return clutch (Fig. 22) as be expla@-iied in greater detail at a later point herein. The dc).- 17'7 is then restored by @pring 179 to the positi<)n shown in Fig. 19. A@ noted here@'@ibefore, the return of the carriage is under control oF a frielion clutch and carriage return tape reel on one end of the power roll drive shaft. This m.- cha-,ais@n is illustrated in detail, Fig. 22. The toggle rr,.c.nanism is oderaied by the carria@e return cam contrc)lled bv its key lever, and the c@am irrr@iediatelv re'Lo tiorriial@ rcsition even thqu-'ii the t<)ggle may be lo.ek,-d i-,, iLs slraightened position to hold the clutch engaged. At the end of the@ car.-iage return movement .1 , the carr;age rpargin slop 190 enga.-es and moves the lever on the frame w.Iiich in tlirn trir)s the cam to furnish the power for cliscilgaging the clutch by breaking the toggje. This a @:1-Iser coi,@rol of the carriare and all@ows the -'.Utcii lo sliii) morneitaril@, while tho. cam is- opp-rpt"I., t6 'di@ertgag@ th@q cluitch, there'oy perinitting the reb6@cLnd iorce or the carriagq tp be dissidated before the Cl -Li' The c@irriaize return tape: reel, the 2,70()44(3 16 its operating to.-gle is shown in Fig. 22 of the clutch and diawings' wherein an extension 21a the power roll shaft is journabed for rotatil)n in the side member of the frame casting 10. The shaft 21a extends laterally be- yond th,- outer fa--e of @ne frame casling 10 where it r<)tatably carries the 6arria.ae return ribbon reel jL96a. Immediately adjacent the reel 196a is a clutch disc 197a which is pinned to the shaft 21a for r@otation therewith. In the norr@ial iion-oper@tive position of the clutch, the ad- 10 jaceni face of the clutch disc 197a has little or no operative influence on the confrontin.- flan e 1.98a of the reel 196a. The opposite face of the clutch disc 197a @is adapted ior contact by an axially slidable plate 199a so that when pressure is applied to move the plate 199a 15 inwardly against the clutch disc 197a a driving connection will be established between the confr<)nting faces of the clutch disc 197a and the flange 1,98a <)f the carriage return tape reel. Clutching pressure is traiismitted to the plate 199a 20 through a sleeve 200a, the outer end of which is engaged by the end of a toggle arm 201a. The to-gle arm 201a is pivoted to a downwardly extending leg 202a constituting a -Dart of a bracket 203a which is attached to the outer suri:ace of the frame casting 10. The toggle arm 25 is pivoted t-o the downwardly extending leg 202a by means of a pivot stud 204a, this pivot being established near the lower end of the toggle arm 201a. The upwardly extending portion of 'Lhe toggle arm 201a has formed therein a U- shaped portion 205a, the bight of which is threaded 30 to receive an adjustin.- screw 206a. The extreme upper end of the arm 201a is notched to receive one end of a spring 207a v,,hich has its other end anchored to the frame casting 10. Thereby, the toggle arm 201a is retained in normal operative relation with a second link 35 208a of the toggle system, this link also having its lower end pivoted <)n the pivot stud 20',a. The rear edge of the link 208a is einbraced by the U-shaped portion of the to.-gle arm 201a, and the adjustin.@ screw 206a bears against that edge of the link. The link 203a has a for- 40 wardly exlending portion 209a to which is pivoted one end of a short link 210a, the other end of said link being pivoted to an arm 211 which is adapted to rock on a pivot pin 212. The arr-n 2'@l has a forwardly projecting finger 213 adapted to engage the I forwardly extendin.- portion 45 209a of the lever 208a at a point below its pivotal connection with the sh<)rt link 210a. As a consequence, the upward movement of the arm 211 is limited. An operating lever 214 is mounted to rock on the pivot stlid 212, the pivot stud 212 bein.a carried by an inwardly project- 50 iii- portion 215 of the supp@orting bracket 203a. The operating arm 214 has a laterally extending flange 216 which is adapted to contact the i@oper edge of the inwardly extending bracket portion 215, thereby limiting the rocking motion of the operating lever 214 in a clockwise 55 Iirection about its pivot pin 212. The arm 211 has an inwardly project@ing flangp 217 which underlies the bottom edge -of the operatin- lever 214. The operat.ing lever 214. is provided at its inner free end with an eye 218 to which the cam controlled car- 60 riage re,urn linkage is connected. Thus, upon operation of the carriage control ca@n th@- operating arm 214 wfll be drawn dovvnwardly, thereby rocking the lever 211 in a counter,,@lockwise direction throu.@h engagement of the lever 214 with the inturned flange 217 of the lever 211. 'u5 This will be effective to. straighten the toggle connection bet-,veen the lever 211 ard the inturned port,',Dn 209a of the lever 208a. The lever 2.@3c, will consequently be rotated in a clockwise direclion, and by virtue of the previously described con-.lection between the lever 201 an 70 the lever 203a, the lever 201a will be rocked in a c ckwise direction about its pivot 2,04-a.. This m<)vement it will be observed is transmittpd by th-- lower end of the lever 201a throu,-h the sieeve 200a and to the pressure plate 199a wi,h the consequent coupling of the clutch ',7 5 dis.- 197a and the reel flange 193a to cause the reel 196a to rotate and wind the carria.-e return tape thereon. The terrpinal me-rnber of the aforementioned stop lever linkage for disengaging by breaking the clutch to.-gle system is diagrammatically illustrated in Fig. ?2 as a pivoted 80 bell crank 219, the f@@t 2i9a of which is adapted to engqge the bottc@74 ed-e o-' the int-LirDed fl--n,-e- 117 of the lever 211. lt is clear from the: fore oin- description how the se ipotion,of the lever 211 will break the t<)ggle systeir@ thereby permi,ting the toggle arm 201a to -@nove 85 in a countercl@ckwise direction about its pivot to release@


17 the clutch disc 197a. A more specific understanding of the several caiii contr<)Iled operating linkage systems bearing on the engagement ard- Iisengagement of the clutch will be acquired as the des,,.-iption of the machine proceeds. As intimated in the foregoiiig paragraph once the carriage return clutcli toggle has been straightened and the clutch has been en-,aged for returning the carria-e, it is necessary to provide means for breakitig the clutc@ toggle and for disengaging the clutch. Herein the mechanism includes cam controlled levers and links shown in Fig. 25 of the drawin.- S. When the hooked end 194 of the i-,ver 189 (Fig. 19) is enga.-ed by the niargin stop 190 the lever 189 is drawn to the left with the restilt that the end 249a of the finger 249 ivhich engages in a notch in the top ed@e of the lever 189 is rocked iii a counierclockwise direction (Fig. 27). This cai-,ses the arm 251 to be similarly rotated, thereby pushing the I;nk 252 to the right in Fig. 25, thus rocking the trip len,er 253 for the trip cam unit in a clock@vise direction. This causes the trip cam tinit to be operatively coupled to the power roller 21. As a consequence the cam @rip tinit is rocked clock- wise, thereby drawing dow-u the link 254 and rocking the lovei- 255 in a cl@-ckwise direction. This draws the link 25' to the right iti Fig. 25 and rocks the arm 257 (Fig. 26) in a cotin,,Crclockwise direction. The arm 257 is cotinected to a bell crank lever 800 (Fig. 20). The opposite ariii of the bell crank lever 800 has a link 801 connected therelo. The link 801 is attached to a lever 802 that is pivoted on a pin 803. One end of a clutch release link 185 is alltached to the free end of the lever 802, the other end of the link IB5 being pivoted to a beil crank 184. The bell crank 184 has pivoted thereto the rear end of the clutch reelase rod 183 and the opposite end of the release rod 183 is attached to the top of a bell crank 219 (Fig. 22). It will appear from the foregoing, therefore, that when the lever 189 (Fig, 19) is pulled to the left by engagement with ',he margin stop i9O, the trip cam lini'@a@e (Fig. 25) is operated and it, through the intermediate link and lever system, ncluding bell crank 800, link 801, lever 802 and the clutc@ release linkage IS3, 184 and 185, will pull rearwardly on the top of the bell crank 219 (Fig. 22) and rock it about its horizontal pivot to lift its forwardly extending arm 219a into engagement with the inturned flange 217 of the togg'ie lever. -this will serve to rotate the toggle lever 215 about the pivot 212 in a clockwise direction, thereby breaking the toggle link and permitting release of the clutch disc 197. Tabi,ilatiizg n2echaiiism The tabulating mechanism is best shown in Figs. 23 and 24. Pivoted on a stud 220 carried by the extension 221 (Fig. 21) is the tabular lever or counter-stop 222 (Figs. 22 and 23), which extends horizontally parallel with the lever 189 (Fig. 19) and is provided with a tooth 223 norn-ially out of the path of movement of the tabular stops 224. Also pivoted on the stud 220 is an operating lever 225 Nvl-iieh has one arm extending almost straight downwardly and provided with a pin 226 in the plane of ,in arm 192 pivoted on a stud 187. The latter is carried by a bracket secuied to the underside of the frame. spring 229, coiinected to the arm 192 and to a fixed pin e 230, holds the arm 192 in contact with pin 226. Th arm 192 is connected by the link 193 to the lever 173 pivoted on the top of the rear rail. The lever 173 cooperates with the edge of the ari-ii 175 and is operated by the carriage rele-,ise levers which are mounted in the carriage, heretofore described. Whenever the arm 225 is rocked clockwise (Figs. 19, 23 and 24), the pin 226, engaging the arm 192, will cause the latter to rock counterclockwise, thereby pushing the link 193 to the left and operating the arm 173. The arni 173, in turn operates the arm 175 to disengage the pinion 148 from the escapement mechanism, this operation being required durin- tabulatina operations in order to release the carriage for free r@'nning movement by the spring motor 159. Tiie lever 226 is resiliently connected to the lever 222, whereby the foregoirg movement of lever 225 also causes the lever 222 to be rocked clockwise to elevate the lug 223 into the path of a tabular slop 224. For this purpose, the horizontal arm of the lever 225 has a short downward extension provided with a pin 232 connected 21100,446 i8 by a spring 233 to a pin 234 on the lever 222. A guard plate 235 is loosely pivoted on the pin 234 and slotted to embrace the pin 232 an(i is placed between the extension of the arm 225 and th.- spring 233. Opposite the front or uvper face ol@ the lever 222, there is provided a similar spriiig which, with spring 23'1, causes the levers 222 and 225 to iiormally move i-.1 tinison. If the tooth 223 should strike the lower ed-e of a coltimn stop 224 wl-ien the lever 225 is rocked- clockwise, springs 233 10 stretch and preveiit daniage to aiiy of the parls. The lever 225 is pivotally connected at 236 to a link 237 (Figs. 23 and 24), liavin.- its lo,@4,er end pivotally connected at 23'0 to a bell crank 239 (Fig. 25). The downwardly extending arm of the bell crank 239 is con- 15 nected by a long link 240 to a rock lever 241 pivoted on the rod 30 which fulcruins the key levers including the tabulating key TK. The ieve@- 241 is conuected by a short link 242 to a conventional cam tinit of the singlelobe type pivotally mounted on the rod 32. 'Lhe cam 20 unit cooperates with the usual power roiler 21. The cani unit is cortrolled in a well known way by the tabulating key 'I'K which, wheii depressed by the operator, causes the cam unit to be actuated by the power roller in a well known way, thereby rocking the cam unit in a 25 clockwise directio@i. This results in drawing down the link 242, rocking the lever 241 clockwise, and drawing th e link 240 to the right in Fig. 25, e reby rocking the b ell crank 239 counterclockwise on pi vot 243. Link 2 37 is thus drawli downwardly depressing the right hand 30 end (Figs. 23 and 24) of the horizoi-ital arm of the lever 225. The arm 192 is operated as described above to free the carriage from the escapeirent mechanism and, at the same time, the lever 222 is rocked clockwise to elevate the lug 223 into the path of the nearest stop 224 immedi- 35 ately to the left of the lug 223. When operated in this fashion, the lever 225 is latched to hold the lug 223 in the path of the column stop 224. As best shown in Fig. 26, thei-c is pi-ovided a latch 244 pivoted on a sttid 245 carried by the frame extension 221 40 and tirged in a clockwise direction by a spring 246 which is anchored to a bracket 247 secured to the frame extensioia 221. Normally the latch 244 bears against the rear face or side of the lever 225 but, when the latter is oper- 4 aied as desci-ibed above, it snaps over the upper edge -5 of the lever 225 and thereby prevents said lever from returning to the positioi-i of Fig. 23. When the lever 225 is rocked as described above, a spring 248 connected to the pin 226 and to the same pin on bracket 230, tends to restore the levers 222 and 225 as a unit to the position 50 of Fig. 23 but the latch 244 prevents this from taking place. Thus, the counter-stop 222 is maintained in the operative position in the path of the column stop 224 until the movement of the carriage brings the column stop into engagement with the lug 223. 55 The lever 222 is slotted horizontally at the point@ Nvhere the stud 220 passes through and norinally the lever 222 occupies the left hand position of Fig. 19. The lever 222 is held in this positioia by means which include the finger 249 (F-igs. 21, 27 and 28) secured to the upper 60 end of a stub shaft 250 which is rotatably mounted in a horizontal portion of frame extension 221 (Fig. 21). Fixed to the lower end of the stub shaft 25 0 is an arm 251 connected by a link 252 to a trip lever 253 pivoted o3i the rod 30. 'Fhis trip lever extends downwardly and r )5 at its lower end is shaped like that portion of a key lever which cooperates with the release lever of a cam unit and controls a trip cam unit (Fig. 25) in the well known manner. The trip cam unit is similar to the other cam units, and it is connected by a link 254 to a rock lever 70 255 somewhat similar to the rock lever 242. The rock lever 255 is connected by a horizontal link 256 to an arm 257 journalled on the stud 245 and engaging a bent- over lug 258 in the latch 244. A torsion spring 259 (Fig. 21) connected to the arn-1 251 and to a collar 260 secured 75 by set screws to the shaft 250, tends to urge the shaft 250 and finger 249 in a clockwise direction with reference to Figs. 27 and 28, thereby holding lever 222 in its left hand position as shown in Fig. 19. When the column stop 224 strikes the lug 223, it 80 moves the lever 222 to the right in Fig. 28, thereby rocking the finger 249 in a counterclockwise direction (Fig. 28). This causes the arm 251 to be similarly rotated, thereby pushing the link 252 to the right in Fig. 25, thus rocking the trip lever 253 for the trip cam unit in a 85 clockwise direction. This causes the trip cam unit to


19 be operatively coupled to the power roher 21 in. a well known way. As a consequence, the trip cam unit is rocked clockwise, thereby drawing down the link @@54 and rockin- the lever 255 in a clockwise direction. This dra-,vs the link 256 to the right in Fi-. 25 and rocks the arm 257 (Fig. 26) in a counterciockwise direction, also, through the lug 258, rocking the latch 244 4o disengage it from the depressed horizontal arm of lever 225. This permits the levers 222 and 225 to rock counterclockwise (Fig. 23) uider the infitience of spring 248, thereby removing lug 223 from- engagement witli the column stop. . In light of the fact that the machine is designed to space units as small as 1/45 of an inch, it is of course quil"e important that carriag-- rebound upon tabulatin.movement thereof be minimized or avoided entirely. In order that the carriage rebo-and may be kept w- ithin very narrow limits, there has been provided a latch lever 810 shown in Figs. 19a and !9b. T@e latch lever is mounted for rocking movement on an eccenlric sleeve 811 of a hexagonal spacer 812 Nvhich is secured by the screw 8@03 in bracket 221. The free e@id of the le,,,er 810 is formed with an upwardly opening hooked portion 814 Nvhich is positioned substantially fiush with the upti,irped end of the lever 222. The hooked eiid of the lever 810 has an external surface 3-@15 which cilgages the tabular stops 224, thereby camming the lever 310 downwardly aga;nst the tension of a spriig 816 which interconnects the levers 222 and 810. As the carri-ge proceeds in its tabulating movement the tabulating stop 224 engages the upturned eld 223 of the lever 222 a.-id moves such lever to the right as viewed in Figs. 1-9 and 19b. This movement of the lever 222 e,-,poses the hooked portion 814 of the lever 310 and permits such portion to engage behind the tabular stop 224 as the free end of the lever is drawn upwardly behin-d the tabular ston under the influciice ol' the spring 816. it will be Lioted that under such conditions the hooked end 814 of the lever 910 engages one face of the tabular stop 224 while the outer upttirned end 223 of the lever 222 engages the opposite face of the tab@alar stop 224. By this means the carria.-e is afforded positive security a.-ainst movement in either direction once the tabulating operation has been effected. it follows, therefore, that any carriage rebound is effect@'@Vely avoided. In the normal operation of the carriage return there is a line spacing operation of the platen as hereinabove described. The return of the carriage involves the tripping of a carriage rettirn cam and the operation of a carriage cILitch release cam. Since in the carriage @-eturn structure heretofore described there is no provisior. for tripping the caitiage return clutch release cain a second time, there has been provided si)ecial mechanisir. which @permits successive line si)aces under the control of the carriage return clutch wfthout the accomp,,)-.iyin.movement of the car.-ia.-e; viithal, there has been provided means for reJeasi-ri.- the carriage retilirn cl-Litch after each such succeeding line spacir,.g operation wilhout resort to the carri,@ge retur-,-i clutch release cam whic!@l is effective during the initial lir@e spacing operation ,Vhirh takes place at the return of the carriage. Reference to Fig. 20 Nvill perl-@aps best illurr@iiiate the i-nechanism NNihich is operative upon second and silbsequent line spacing ope-rations wiie@l the carriage is iii its returned position. A lever 820 is pivoted adia-.en@ the lever 802 on the pivot pin 803. The :downwardly extending leg of the lever 820 is connected to the lower end of the lever 802 by ineans of a spring loop 1.21 v;hich has one end anchored to a Din 822 extendi-tig laterally .4Lrom the lower eiid of the iever 320, and the other end of the sprin-. 82'@ is atichored on a st,,id 823 extend-in,a laterally from the lower end of the lever 802. An upper leg O'L the lever 820 has p;voted tl-ie;eto --n angular shaped catch 824 whirh is normally hei'd agair,.st a shoulder 825 formed in the upwardly extending portion of the lever 820, the force for holding the catc'ii 824 in that position being provided by a spriiig 826 which has one end,affached to the catch aiid the other end to a pin 827 extending laterally from the lever. The catch 824 bas an inturr@ed horizontal lir) '428 .vhicLnormally lies in the path ol' the margin stop 190. During the return of the carriage the margin stop @,90 @,vill engage the inturned lip 823 of the catch 824 aiid will rock the catch in a @countercloel(wise directio@i, the.-eb@, sintly moving it out of the way so that the margid stop 2,700,446 20 may engage the end of the lever 189 to effect operation of the carriage return clutch release cam as hereinbefore described. At such tinie the catch 824 will return to its normal position against the stop shoulder 825 and when in such position the horizontal lip 328 thereof will underlie the margir.- stop 190. From the forego-Ing it follows that ihe lener 820 will be inhibited against rocking about its pivot pin 803. if, therefore, under such conditions the carriage return 10 key is a.-ain depressed, the carriage return clutch will be engaged as heretofore described in connee4tion with the i-eturii of the carriage. Since, however, the lever 820 is locked against moverdent, the carriage retilrn clutch toggi@- iinkage wilt be stra ghtened under t e Li 15 iiifluence of the carriage return control cam and the link 135 will be drawn to the left in Fig. 20 against the tension of t'iie bow spring 821. At such time the carriage return clutch will be engaged and the tape reel 196@t will be rotated sufficiently to effect i line spacing operation 20 as hereintofore described. The carriage return clutch toggle linkage will be broken immedia,ely after its control cam ha.- been opera'ced by the expanding action of the bow spr-ing 'o2l aga@list the I.ocked lever 820, this tendin.- to move the 25 lever 802 to fne right in Fig. 20. The movement o' t' e lever 1.@02 results in drawing the link 185 to the ht in Figs. 19 and 20 with the consequent operation of the iinger 219 (Fig. 22) and the breakin.- of the clutch toggle linkage in a manner similar to that described in 30 conliection with the return of the carriage. Back spacing of the carriage is under the influe@ice of a back spac-.n.- cam Nvhich is not shown since it is identical in structure and function wich the cams already described. Herein it is sufficient to say that N@ihen the '.@ 5 back space key is depressed the associated cam will be released into contact ,vith the power roll 21 and a link 830 (Figs. 14 and 19) ivill be drawn forwardly. The link 830 is connected to a bell crank 831 which is mounted for rocking -notion about a stud 832 supported 40 in the rai'@ 129. One le.- of the bell crank 831 is connected to a link 833 and the latter has its opr)osite end connected to a ratchet 834 (Fig. 14) which is mounte@i on the castin.- 127 adjacent the gear 137. Each time the linkage system now described is operated by its 4-@5 operatin.- cam, the ratchet 834 is carried into engagement with the teeth of the geat 137 and rr@oves sa;d gear the space of one tooth in a retrograde direction to effect back spacing of the carriage. The atitomatic control of the maenine requires that 50 certain control contacts be opened each time th-- carriage is returned or the carriage is back spaced. The coiitacts in question are the carria-.e return cotitacts CRTC (Fig. 19) and the back si)ace contacts BSC (1-'ig. 14). By first referring to Fig. 19 it l@,lill be seen 5;j that the contacts CRTC are under the irpmedia@le control of a contact op,- rator 850 which is under the iniluence of a stud 851 extending from a face of the plate 186, the plate 136 being pivoted on the DiNot sttid 137. The norpial resilience of the movable leaf of the contact 6( C@RTC holds the co.,itact closed and liolds the plate 186 in its extreme dlockv,,ise rotative positio--n. The lever 192 carries a pin 852 which engages the right hand edge of the plate 186 and which is effective, therel'Ore, when the lever 192 is rocked in a counterclockwise direction 6.3 during carriage return to rock the plate 186 in a co,,iE',terclockwise direction about its pivot 137, with the resu.it that the contact CRTC is broken. By reference to Fig. 14 of t'iie dra,,T@,in-'s it mav be observ--d how the contact BSC is odened during b-,ick 9'0 snacing movement of tlle carria c. The bell crank 831 b . as a stud $60 extendiig from a fdce thereof apd this stud engages and operates a contac-t onera-titg Iiiik 861, oi-ie end of tle Iiiik 861 being connected to the movable leaf 862 of the contact BSC. Each time, therefore, that 75 the link 830 is drawn forwardly and the bell crank 831 is rocked abo-Lit its -oivot 332 in a clockwise direction, the contact operating iink $61- will be moved 'Lo th,- rilyht with ttie result that tne contap-t BSC wil-I be opened. it has been generally sloted hereinabove that during 8 carriage rettirn the l@-ver 173 is rocked to engage the lever 175 for fhe pi,-rp-se of disconn-eting the escapement cluten durin,- sul-@ return move"@ent. it is nOw possible to trace the st)ecific naechanism by which this function is performed. The lever S20 (--Fig. 20A) has q 8b laterally s_paced, generally rearwardly extending finger


$76 froth the iade of which extends a stud 871. The stud 871 and the stud 852 extending from the outer face of the lever 192 (kig. 20A) are interconnected by means of a loop 872. Consequently, when the connected levers 802 and 820 are rocked about the pivot pin 803 by move- ment of the link 185 to the left in Fig. 19, such motion is impart ed to the lever 192 because of the pin and loop con- nectio n just mentioned. The lever 192 will rock about its pivot 187 in a counterclockwise direction, thereby mov- ing the link 193 to the lef t in Fig. 19 and rocking the 10 lever 173 into engagement with tiie lever 175 with the result that the escapement ciutch mechanism is disengaged. It is contemplated that the carriage return contact CRTC be opened also during tabulation and during extra line spacing operation when the carriage has been fully 15 return ed. Durin g tabulation it wiU be remembered the bell crank 239 will draw the right hand end of the lever 222 down- wardl y with the result that a downwardly extending por- tion 873 of that lever will be rocked in a clockwise 20 directi on. The free end of the downwardly extending portio n of the lever 873 has a pin 226 which is adapted to engage the right hand edge of the lever 192, thereby rockin g the latter lever in a couiaterclockwise direction and engaging the pin 852 thereon with the right hand 2,-) edge of the plate 186. This wiR result in the counter- clock wise movement of the plate 186 and the resultant 6penin g of the contact CRTC through downward move- ment of the operating link 850. Provis ion has also been made for opening the contact 30 CRTC during extra line spacing operations when the carria ge is in its returned position. In connection with such line spacing operalions described before, it has been explai ned how the lever 820 is locked against inovement by engagement between the latch 828 and the lower face 3 @@' of the margin stop 190. In such case only the lever 802 can be rocked about its pivot 803 and accordingly there has been provided a laterally spaced and generally down- wardl y extending finger 875. The finger 875 extends into the path of a pin 876 which is carried by and extends 40 from the rear face of the plate 186. It follows, therefore, that when the lever 8OZ is rocked in a clockwise direction about its pivot 803 under the force of the link 185, the finger 875 of said lever will rock into engagement with . the pin 876 and thereby rock the plate 186 about its 4,) pivot 187 in a counterclockwise direction, thereby open- ing the carriage return contact CRTC. Code selector unit The operation of the punch 15 is also under control 60 of the code selector unit. It will be appropriate at this thne, therefore, to describe the manner in which the code select or unit controls not only the letter spacing magnets EMI, EM2 and EM3, but also how it controls the punch magn ets PMI, PM2, PM3, PM4, PM5 and PM6 (Fig. 55 51A). Thecodeselectorunitl3isshownbestinFigs.29 throug h 32. The unit is operated upon the actuation of each of certain keys of the main keyboard, to energize the punch magnets PMI-PM6, inclusive, singly and in 61) combi nation so as to punch in a tape the code desig- nation which corresponds to the particular key actuated. The code selector unit 13 comprises a frame structure which is removably mounted at the base of the machine as shown in Fig. 3, and a plurality of selector slides 261 and 262 are mounted, respectively, for longitudinal slid- ing movement in the frame sllructure. The slides 261 and 262 correspond, respectively, to the keys of the keyboard which control the punch 15. As explained previously, each time a key is depressed, 70 a related one of the cam units 12 is tripped and the cam 31 of the tripped unit then engages the constantly rotat- ing power roller 21. As a result such cam unit is rocked first away from the power roller 21 and then back toward the power roller and relatched in the position shown. 75 The relationship of the several cam tinits 12 with respect to the power roller 21 is indicated in Fig. 3. The cam units 12 appearing to the right of the roller in Fig. 3 are referr ed to herein as front cam units and the units appear- ing to the left of the roller in Fig. 3 are referred to herein as the back cam units. Each cani unit 12 which is tripped by a key of the main keybo ard has a downward extension 263 carrying a pin 264 and each time such a cam unit is tripped and is operat ed, its pin effects a sliding movement of a corre- spondi ng one of the selector slides. The pins 264 engage 22 upstanding lugs 264a at the forward end of the siide8, whereby the siides are adapted for reciprocation by their related cams 31. The seleclor slides 26i are thos.- which are operated by corresponciiiig front cam units and the slides 262 are those which are operated by corresponding rear cara anits. As t' e cam units 12 are arranged in n staggered relation along the power roller 21, the slides 261 and 262 will be arranged alternately in the frame structure, as shown in Fig. 29. The frame structure for the selector unit includes a front guide comb 265 and a rear guide comb 266 and the selector slides are mounted re@pectively, ii aligned slots 267 formed in the two combs and are supported therein by suitably mounted antifriction rollers 268 (Figs. 30 and 31). A stop plate 269 overlies the front comb 265 and cooperates with spaced lugs 270 and 271 on the selector slides to limit the longitudinal sliding movement of the latter. Tension springs 27Z (Fig. 29) connecting pins 273 projecting from adjacent slides 26'x and 262 serve to urge such slides against the stop plate 269 and thereby maintain the slides in their respective posi-L-ions shown. From the foregoing it will be apparent that each time a slide 261 (Fig. 29) is operated by its related front cam unit 31, it will be moved lengthwise forwardly of the machine aiid will be returned by the spring 272 attached thereto and that each time a slide 262 (Fig. 29) is operated by its reiated back cam unit, it will be moved rearwardly thereby and will be returned to the position shown by its spring. The sliding moveinent of the selector slides 261 and 262, which rcsults from each operation of their related cam units 31, provides for the energizing of the six punch selector magnets PMI to PM6, inclusive, and also provides for energizing the ptinch clutch magnet PCM. This control of the punch by each of the selector slides is effected by the permutative closing of six selector code contacts SCI to SC6, inclusive (Fig. 29) and by the closing of the common contact SCC. The code coiatacts SCI to SC6, inclusive, control, respectively, the energizing of the punch magnets PMI to PM6, inclusive. These code contacts SCI to SC6, incl-asive, are operatzd, respeetively, by correspondiiig bails SBI to SB6, inclusive. The common contact SCC is operated by a corresponding bail SBC. As shown in Fig. 29, the bails SBI to SB6, inclusive, and SBC are arranged in horizonta'ily spaced relation and each such bail comprises a bail element,274 extendinj transversely through aligned elongated slots 275 form(@a in all of the selector slides. Each bail element 274 is connected at its two outer ends to supporting arms 276 and 277, respectively, the arm 276 being secured at its outer end to a pivot pin 278 carried by one frame 279, and the arm 277 being mounted on a pivot projection 280a extending from a bail shaft 280 which extends through aligned openings in the side frame plate 281 and in a vertical flange 282 of a frame plate'283. A yoke 277a, attached to the inner end of the shaft 280, connects the arms 277 with their respective bail shafts 280. An inturned portion of the yoke 277a embraces the arm 277, as best shown in Fig. 32, and provides a positive operating connection between the parts. The right hand end of each bail shaft as viewed in Fig. 29. extends outwardly of the flange 282 and an upstanding contact actuatidg element 284 is fixed thereto in position to close the corresponding set of contacts of the group SCI to SC6, inclusive, and the contact SCC. The bottom of the slot 275 of each of the selector slides 261 and 262 is formed with upstanding cam project@ons 285 which are permutatively located on the severa! selector slides and operate corresponding ones of the bails SB1 to SB6 and the bail SBC. Each cam projectioii 285 functions to cam 'Lipward a related bail element when the selector slide on which the cam projection is located is moved len.-thwise by the operative movement of its corresponding cam unit 31, and the upward movement of each such bail element results in rotating the related bail shaft 280 to close the related set of selector code contacts of the group SCI to SC6, inclusive, and the contact SCC, Each of the selector slides 261 and 262 is provided with a cam Projection 285 for raising the bail SBC and closing the common contact SCC each time such slide is operated. The cam projections 285 for operating the remaining bails SBI to SB6, inclusive, are so located on each selector slide that they provide, when such slide is operated, for the closing of those code contacts of the group SCI to SC6,- inclusive, which correspond


'a,700,446 23 to the code hole positions for representing the char- acter or functional operation corresponding to the char- acter key which was actupted to operate such slide. Each selector slide is originally formed with lower cam projections 285 and the projections not to be used are ' removed by any suitable means. 'fhe respective posi- tions of the cam projections whicli have been removed in the slide 261 of Fig. 30 are indicated by dotted Iiiies. It i@ noted that the slide 261 of Fi.-. 30 contains cam projections which will operate the bails SBC, SB4 and 10 SB6, and the latter will therefore close the related contacts SCC, SC4 and SC6, respectively, when such slide is operated. From the previous description, it will be obvious that 'Lhe closure of such contacts will energize the punch cliitch magnet PCM and the pulich selector 15 magnets PM4 and PM6 and thereby operate the punch 15 to punch the 4-6 code designation in the tap6. As shown in Fig. 52, the 4-6 designa,ion represents the period. The foregoing is a description of how the - selector 20 unit operates to select the proper plnches for ptinchin.- code in a tape in response to the depression of either character key or a functional key on the keyboard of the machine. It will be remembered that it was gen- erally stated hereinbefore that the selector slides are also operative to energize the letter space selecting mag- nets EM1, EM2 and EM3. The following will, there- fore, be an explanation of the structure resulting in these functions. Each of the selector slides 261 and 262 (Figs. 30 and 31) supports a second tier of bails -'0 286a, 286b, 286c, 286d, 286e and 1-86f. These bails are supported in notches 287 which correspond i-,i the-ir gen- eral nattire and function to the notches 275 heretofore described. Associated with certain of the bails 286a- 286f, inclusive, are cam surfaces 288 which are permu- tatively arraiged in fashion similar 1,0 the cam surface 285 described in connection with the punch selectioii bails. Since the escapement mechanism of the machine is Linder the control of three magnets EM!, EM2 and EM3, 40 respectively, of one, tnvo and three units of sp-,tcin.-. it is essential of course that these magnets be energized sin,gly or in combination to obtain a letter space which is proportional to the unit width of the letter being struck. Accordinaly, the bails 286a, 286b and 286c coti- 45 trol the closure of bail contacts ECA, ECB and ECC. These contacts are operative during the operatioii of the machine @vhen the type basket is in lower case position. The bails 236d, 2o6e and 286f control the closure of contacts ECD, ECE and ECF. These contacts are oper- ative during operation of the machine whep th-- type basket is in upper case position. A switch CSC (Figs. 4 and 5) which is operated by the shiftin--- m4ovement of the carriage selects either the lower case contacts ECA, ECB and ECC or the upper cas-- contaci-s ECD, .3 ECE and ECF dependin.- on the position of tile type basket. Tape pitnch and translatoi- cliiteli The operation of the code translator 14 and the opera- 6@) tion of the tape punch 15, both to be described prese-@itly, is each under the control of an electromagnetic cliitch. The clutch as it applies to the translating i-nechan-is-M is shown in Figs. 33 and 34, while its application to the tape punch is shown generally in Fig. 36 and Fig. 47. C In each of these instances the electromagnetic clutches are identical in structtire, and a specific tinderstanding thereof may be attained by reference to Figs. 33 and 34. In these figures the shaft 289 may repres.,nt the cam shaft of either the code trqnslating unit or the tape 70 punching unit. The shaft 289 has provided a pair of bearing hubs 290 and 291 kvhich are adapted for the free rotational s,,ipport of the drive gear 292 (,;@!liieh may be either the drive gear for the trpnslator unit or the tape punch) the latter having a hub extension 293 in 75 contact with the outer bearing 291. The outer end of the shaft 289 is fitted with a bearing sleeve 294 -,,,rliich is affixed for rotatior@ tberevi.,th by means of a set screw 295. The beari-.lg sleeve 294 has aii inwardly extending hub 296 of reduced diameter to which is fixed a sleeve 50 297 by means of a set screw 298. The sleeve 297 anchors ope end 299 of a belical'IY wotind expansion clutch spring which is wound to slirround the inwardly ex,tending gear hub 293, as well as to surround a por- tion of sleeve 297 which is of the same di@-tneter as the 85 24 gf-ar hub 293. The opposite end 300 of th pluteb spring 301 is anch@ored -a sleeve 302 whic4 F mo nted in .- - on , 15 @u, , a recess formed in the gear hijb 293 and in the slqeve 297. The gear 292 is constantly driven while the machine is in operation, and its power is transmitted to the shaft 289 because the clutch spring 301 normally grips the gear hub 293. When it is desired to disconnect the shaft 289 from the gear 292, it is merely necessary to block rota tion of the sleeve 302 whereby coiitinued rotation of the sleeve 302 will expand the el-Litch spring 301 to release its -rip on ihe gear hub 293 and the sleeve 297. The outer peripheral surface of the sleeve 302 has a l@tch shoulder 303 (Fig. 34) extendilig in an axial direction thereon, and when this shoulder is engaged by an armature 304, the sleeve 302 is held against rotation of an electromagnet 305. When the ma-gnet 305 is energized, the armature 304 will be attracted thereto, thereby pprr.,iitting rotation of the sleeve 302 under the influenc-of the spring 301, contraction of the clutch spring 301 into contact with the .-eir hub 293 and sleeve 297 and the consequent rotati6n of the shaft 289 with the gea,r 292. The outer peripheral face of the sleeve 294 also has an axially disposed latch sh6ulder 306 formed thereon which is provided for engagement by a pivoted latch 306a, the latch bein.- pivoted on the magnet yoke 308 by meaiis of a laterally extending pivot bin 309. The latch 306a is normally urged in a clocl@wise direction by means of a spring 310 which has oiie end attachf-d thereto and the 6ther end to an anchor pin 311 extendin.- frorn the magnet yoke 308. By reference to Fig. 46 the foregoing arrangement will be clear as well as the fact that the armattire 304 is also pivot-@d on the pivot pin 309 and that it includes a rearwardly pro ecti-iig extension 312 to which one end of a spring 313 is attached, the other end thereof being attached to a stud 314 extending inwardly from the magiiet yoke 303. From the foregqing it will be seen that both the armattire 304 and the latcn 306,.i are spring-pressed into enaagemept with their resi)ec'Live latch shou,.ders 303 and 306. It will also b.-- seen that the latch shoulders are so disposed in relation to the direclion of rotaciori of the parts that t@e arinature 304 pr.events- clockv@ise rotation of th-- slee,@,e 302 while the latch 306a prevent's counterclock,;vise rota,tion of t,@e siceve 29j4l. When the ma-,net TCM, as in ',he case of the translator, or the magnet PCM, as in 'Lhe case of the punch, is deenergized, the armature 304 will be puiled down into contact with the sleeve 302 and will block rotation of the sleeve as soon as the e@Tid of the a.- mature and the latch shoulder 303 come into contact with each other. The momentuni of the shaft 289 wiil tend to calse some additional rotation which would result in recoil were it not for engagei-nent of the 1-,tteh 306a with the latch shoqlde,r 306. The ia:',ch should--r 306 is so position d in respect to the end @f the latch 306a that engagementebetween the armatiire 304 and the latch shoulder 3R3 is effected before the la.tch shoulder 306 passes beyond the eDd of the latcli 306a. After the latch shoulder .3.06 is carried beyond the eiid of 'Lhe !?,@tch 306,j iipder mon-Lentum of the shaft 289, tl-@e reco'll of the shaft is dam_oencd by er@gagerr@cut between t.@le lotch 306a and its -elateci ]alch sho6ider 306 as the shpft begins its retrograde movement under the normal tet-ision of the clutch sr,,-ing 3131. The spring will, therefore, be expanded beyo;id i'@s nor.,nal dia@-neter to hold it free of the drive hi,-.,b 293. Ttipe plinch The tape plinch 15 (Figs. 35, 36, 37, 38 and 39) is a power driven @@ivit, rerciovably mouraed at the left hand rear portion of @he m-cli@j frame 10. A normally statioiiary rotary cam shaft 315 makes one revolution under control of th,-- riiagnetic@ally oderated c.-utch hereinabove described aiid illustrated in Figs. 3 3 and 3 4 f@or @--ach punch cyc'@e. A tape from t s-Lipply spoo" 316 (Fig. 2), reniovably mount.-d a,L the rear of the m-,,.chi-rie, passes over the top of the Punch tinit 15, and the h-oles are punched up@wardly at the front of the u@iit for cinvenien, iiianipulation -,2,nd observatio-Ti o.' the tape by the o erato,-. The tape I p is fed for spa@@lag ol@ th-, holes by a pin. ivheel duri.,ig e4ch punch cyc,le, and the pin whee,'t maybe rianually @'urned to move @he tape in @ither direct-Ion. The te,,pe may be easily inse.rlted edg@awise into the punch. The,selector @centacts .1@-'Cl th ough SC6 -select the icode


2,100,440 holes to be punched in the tape by energizing the asso- ciated ones of the sLx punch magnets PiMi through PM6, which, by attracting their ar:@-iatures, release correspond- ing punch lever latches. 'lie puuch clutch magnet is jointiy controlled by a contact operated by the releasing 5 of any one or more of these latches, and by the common selector contact SCC. During the initial part of the punch shaft rotation, the latches which were released are locked in their released position, and the ones wliich were not released are locked in their normai position. 10 As stated hereinabove, the structural details of the tape punch 15 are shown in Figs. 35 to 39, inclusive. As shown, the punch comprises six vertically arranged code hole punches CPI to CP6, inclusive, which correspond, respec'cively, to the six code hole positions of the code 15 system employed. As shown in F-1g. 36, the vertical code punches are arranged beneath and in a ttansverse row across the tape punching station where the coded data is recorded. The punch 15 also comprises a vertically dis- posed feed hole punch FP which is located between the 20 code punches CP3 and CP4, and which f,,inctions durin.a each operating cycle of the punch to punch the relatively small tape feed holes which are located in all record columns of the tape alid which are engaged by the tape feed pins. 25 I As shown in Figs, 35 and 37, the code punch CPI is mounted for vertical reciprocatory movement in spaced aligned guide passa-,es 318 in a fixed guide block 319 and in an aligned die opening 320 in a fixed die plate 321. The lower end of the ptinch CP1 is pivotally connected 3 0 in a suitable inanner to the right hand end of a related punch actuating lever 322, and the lever 322 is pivoted in- termediate its ends on a rod 323 which exteiids trans- versely of and forms a part of a punch operating frame 324. The operating frame 324 also comprises spaced side -'5 arms 325 joined by a spaciiig sleeve 326 (Fig. 36) and pivotally supported on a transversely extending stop rod 327 which is suitably fixed at its ends to the punch frame structure. The left hand end of the pu-@ich lever 322, as viewed in Fig. 37, engages the top of the stop rod 327 40 when the punch CPI is in its normal or inactive position shown. It will be appreciated that the remaining code punches CP2 to CP6, inclusive, and the feed hole punch FP are constructed the same as the punch CPI and are mounted in the same manner in the guide block 319 and '15 die pla"e 321 a-@id are connected, respectively, at their lower ends to related actuating levers 322. Such related actuating levers are arranged side-by-sid@- in the frame 324 and are pivoted on the transverse rod 323. The ends of all the levers, which are remote from their punches, 50 rest on top of the stop rod 327 wilh the punches i-@i their normal or iractive position. A tension spring 328 con- nects the right-hand end, as viewed in Fig. 37, of each punch operatirig lever to a fixed flange plate 329 and thereby constantly urges the several code punches and 55 feed punch to their -inactive or withdrawn positions shown in the drawings. . As shown in Fig. 37, the lower face of the guide plate 321 is spaced :rom the upper face of the guide block 319 to provide a passage through which a tape is fed length- 60 wise from left to right. The tape is further guided in its lengthwise movement across the top of the punch by a guide roller 330, shown in Fig. 35. After being punched, the tape passes over a tape feed sprocket 331 having pins 332 fitting within the feed holes formed by the feed hole 65 punch FP. The sprocket 331 is indexed once for each operating cycle of the punch 15 so as to advan,-e the tape to the next blank record column, as will be explained more fully hereinafter. The ptinch 15 comprises an operating cam shaft 315 70 suitably journalled at its ends in the fixed frame struc- ture of the punch and having a plurality of control cams 333, 334, 335 and 336 mounted thereon. Each revolu- tion of the shaft and the cams thereon etects an operating cycle o'L the punch and each operating cycle is iniliated 75 by enga.-ing a punch clutch 337 (Fig. 36) which is the same as the clutch illustrated in Figs. 33 and 44. The clutch 337 connects the coiistantly running drive gear 23 with the operating shaft 315 for one revolution of the latter and then disconnects the two atid stops the operat- 80 ing shaft 315 in its home or inactive position shown in the drawings. The punch clutch is engaged by the ener- gizing of a punch clutch magnet PCM. The structure and mode of operation of the punch clutch 337 has been described in detail hereinbefore. 85 26 The cams 3S5 and 336 are substantially c6mplementary cams and are engaged, respectively, by followers 338 and 339 Nvhich are located in spaced relation, as shown in Fig. 35, on the otiter end ol an arm 325. The follower 339 is a roller carried by the upper fork 325a of the arm 325 -@vhile the follower 338 is a slight projection on the lower @lork 325b of the arm 325 (Fig. 37). From an examination of Figs. 35 and 37, it will be apparent that each time a punch operating cycle is effected by rotating the shaft 315 one revolution counterclockwise, the cam 335 engaging the follower 339 will first move the operating frame 324 upward or counterclockwise abo-at its pivot rod 327, the cam 336 being so shaped as to permit su,,h upward inovement. Then, the cam 336 by its engagement with tfic follower proj'ection 338 will insure movement of the operating frame 324 downwardly under the force of the springs 328, or clockwise, and back to the i@lactive position shown, the cani 335 being so shaped as to permit such return movement of the franie 324. -fhe identical cams 335 and 336 at opposite sides of the franic 324 insure the even movement of the frame aiid pi-event warping of the frame as it moves up and dow.,i. Durin-. such upward and downward movement of the fraine 324, the rod 323, on which the punch actuating levers 322 are pivoted, is also moved upward and then restored to the position shown. It will be apparent that if, during sucli movement of the rod 323, the left ha-@ld ends of all punch actuating levers 322 are not held down against the stop rod 327, such actuating levers will be moved by the rod 323 clockwise about their pivotal connections with their related punches, the springs 328 bei@ig sufficiently strong to hold their right hand ends stationary. On the other hand, if the left hand end of any one of the puncli actuating levers is held down against the fixed rod 327, the upward movernent of the rod 323 will then effect a counterclockwise movement of the lever, or levers, so held, about the stop rod 327 as a pivot and in so doiig, the punch connected to e,,ich lever so held wili be moved -cpward against the force of its spring 328 and through the tape, thereby ptinching a code hole in the corres@i)onding code position of the tape, in the case of the code punches, and punching a feed hole in the tape in the case of the feed punch. Ir. the construction sho,,vn th,- lever 322 corresponding to the feed punch FP is permanently held down against the stop rod 327 by the outer end of an arm 340 (Fig. 35), the arm 340 being fixed at its other end to a fixed frame member 341. Thus, for each revolution of the shaft 315, a feed hole will be punclied in the tape in the manner explained. The code designations are punched in the tape by the selective latching against th,- stop bar 327 of the adjacent elids of those actiiating levers which are connected to the code punches corresponding to the code positioiis where it is desired to punch the code holes. Selective latching of the left hand end as viewed in Figs. 35 and 37, of the six code punch actuatiiia, levers 322, against the stop rod 327, is effected, respectively, by the selective releasing of six correspondiiag latch levers 342. Th.- releasing of the six latch levers is controlled by the selective energization of the six corresponding punch magnets PMI to PM6, inclusive. . The six latch levers 342 are arranged in side-by-side relation and are pivoted on a transverse flxed rod 343. The tipper ends of the six latch levers extend, respectively, through corresponding slots 344 of a comb plate 345 fixed to the frame member 341, and slich latch levers are aligned, respectvely, with the adjacent ends of their respective code punch actuating levers which also extend through the corresponding slots 344. The six latch levers are each urged clockwise as viewed in Figs. 35 and 37 by tension springs 346 connecting, respectively, projections on the latch levers and the ilange of a transverse fixed frame plate 348 (Fig. 35). In the nornial or inactive position of the parts as shown, each latch lever 342 o'L the group is held against clor-l- wise movement by its -Lipper poirited end 349 en,-aging the right halid end of a latching notch 350 cut in the under face of the pivoted atmature 351 of its relalcd selec',or magnet oi. the aroup PMI to PM6, inclusive. A tension spring 352 holds each armature in the position shown. When any one of the selector magnets of the group PMI t6 PM6, inclusive, is selectively energized, in a manner which will be explained hereinafter, its related armature 351 is attracted and moves tipward, thereby releasin-., its related latch lever 342, and the latter is then mbved


2,7004,@46, 27 by its sp 3,46 clqckwise qs viewed in Fig . @5 qAO @7 riqg 4qo tp a. point.where a latchin-a notch 353 on the released latch lever engages over the left hand end of its related p:qilch ac'ualing. lever, and thereby holds such engaged punch actuating lever dowi3 a,-4insi the stop rod 327 so that upon subseqvent rotation of the o erating sh4ft 315, @p the cams 335 and 336, through the frame 324, will cause thQ right hand end of such i)unch actuatinr lever to move its rel@ted code punch of th6 groiip CPI to CP6, inclusive, vpward and punch a code h6le in the corresponding code 10 position of the tapp-, in the manner previously explaiiied. The selector magnets PMI to PM6, incltlsive, are d is- posed in staggered relation as shown in Fig. 35 so t'hat such magnets and ttieir arma@,ures are aligned with 'their related latch levers. The armatures oi- adjaceiit selector 15 magnets overlap at their outer ends so that their latcl@iig notches 33-0 are aligned in a transverse - horizontal plane when the parts ai-e in the inactive position shown. 1)uring each operatij3g cycle of the ptinch 15, a cam 354 (Fig. 36) on the punch operating shaft 315 fl"nc- 20 tions to lock those latch levers ivhich have bee-,, tripped by thei,r related selector magnets, and also functions to lock the untripped latch levers in their inactive positic,@is so @hat they c@nnot interfere with the piinchii-@g diiring the same cycle of the selected code combiiiation by the 23 tripped levers. To this end, a latch lock baii lever 355 is rotatably mounted on a transverse rod 356 suitably flxed to the frame structure of the punch and includes a fol- lower arm 357 carrying a roller 358 which is constan'Llv urged against the face of the cam 354 by a te s'on sprtil@ 3( n I 359 (Fig. 35) coiinecting the arrn 357 with a suitable fixed part (not shown) of the punch frame. The bail lever 355 carries a lockin.- bail 360 extending trailsversely across the spear-shaped ends 361 of arms 362, the latter bein(, integrally formed, respectively, with the six latch lever@ '.5 342. As the latch levers 342 are released by their asso- ciated magnets, the cams 354 and spring 359 move the locking b@il 360 counterclockwise, as viewed in Fig. 37, and toward the ends 361 of the levers 342. As a result of s@uch movement, the lockitig bail 360 will pass beneath 40 t4e points of the ends 361 of any untripped latch and will en-ag-, the lower inclined surfaces thereof a. thereby locc- s@,ich untripped leve.-s in their inactive Po- sitions. The ends 361 of any latch levers @vhich have _ been previously tripped will then be so - positioned that 41) tlle locki@ig bail 360 will pass above the points of such ends and will engage the tipper inclined surfaces thereof and thereby lock any such tripped levers in latching rela- tion with respect to their related punch acttiating levers. The cam 363 (Figs. 3 6 and 3 8) is the tape feed cam and 50 it functions during each punch operating cycle to advance the tape feed sprocket 331 and tape an amount sufficient to move the punched record colu.-nn out of puncliing posi- tion and to move a blank record column into plinchina position. A lever arm 364 carryin 36@ 55 g a follower roller engaging the feed cam 363 is pivoted to a suitably fixed stud 366 and it has pivoted to its right hand end a feed pawl 367. A stud 368 on the pawl 367 engages an edge of the lever 364 and a tension spring 369 connects the stud. 368 and a fixed pin 37,0 on the lever arm 364. A 60 tens-on spring 371- urges the follower 365 upward and a.@ainst the face of the feed cam 363. A ral,chet wheel 372 is fixed to the tape feed sprocket 331 and is ada-oted to be engaged by the u per end of the pawl 367, when the latter is moved iipward. It will be apparent that when the punch shaft 315 to which the cam 363 i5 fixed rotptes, thereby rotating the cam 363 counterclockwise so that the roller 365 comes into contact with the high portion of the cam 363, the arm 364 will move the pawl i-,ito the path of the teeth of the wheel 372 and then downward into 70 engagement with a tooth of the tape feed ratchet 372 aild thereby index such ratchet and tape feed sprocket clock- -,vise when the cam 363 again allonvs the arm 364 to rock in a clockwise direction about its pivot 366. A detevit lever 373. pivoted oi a pivot stud 374, carries 75 a detent roller 375 vihich is adapted to engage the teeth of a detent gear 376 which is fast on the shaft of the tape feed sprocket. A spring 377 keeps the de@en, roller 375 in contact with teeth of the detent gear 3i6- a'nd thereby stab@"lizes the operation of the tape feed mechanism. 50 Warr.edial,eiv after a i)unching operation the lat'cl@i levers are res,tored to their inactive or latched i)ositions sho-,@,,n v,,here they are held by the la+ching not@hes 350 of the armatures 35.1, ol. thleir i-elated ma-neit@ of the, grovp PINII to. PM6, inclusive. Thisr is eff6@t6d by a resi6ring bail 5.@ Z-,3 379 (Figs. 35, and 39). extending across the lower side- of the right hand a-rms 362 of'all latch levers 342. The. bail 378, is formed integral with an arm 379, and the latter is fulcrumed at one erd on thi@ f@xed rod 343 and is adaptqd to be enga-ed at its olher and Q@ater end by an eccentrii@aliy motinted roller 3@80 extending between and fixed at ita e-@ids 'o l,h@ tape feed cam 363 and the locking bail cam 334. DLiring the mid part o' the piiich cycle, the locking bail 360 havin- been restored to ineffective position, the eccentric st,,id 380 eagagcs, the outer erd of the lever arm 379. As a res,@lit, the arm 379 and b@ail 378 are moved co-,iitercloc,@wise abqut the rod 3.4@. Thus, the bail 3,78 eng-,.iges any previoi-isly tripped lotch leyera 362 and moves the-@ii co-Lipte.-clockwise and slightly'past th.- latching positioi shovvn in Figs. 35 and 37. in moving the pi:eviously tripped latch levers past their latching position, the bail 378 will also engage and ni-ove the rernainin- or untripped latch levers coilnterclockwise. As the latch levers are th,,is moved coun,,Crclockwise, oiie of the levers engages a b-ail cleme:it 331 formiiig a par,, of a I- liock-,off bail lever 332 which is pivotec't on a rod 383. The knock@off lever 392 also incl,,@.des a se@.-ond bail elei-,ient 3.84 v@,hich is ar:7 ra-a-ed -.tbove and exteiids across the oiiter eiids, of all ai7inatures a5l of the ptinch mag-iiets PMI tQ PM6., in- el usive. Thus, the lever 381 is rocked clocki7i-ise and the bail eler-,ie@it 384 thereof will enga.@e and release any of the armatires 351 that nay be stuck with the result that all ariiiatlires will be positioned a-aiiist the ends 349 of tbe,'@r jeiated latch le I ve,.-s and held 'tbere b their related y spring@ '-52. The restoring bail 378 is theii p-ermitted by the @i-,rther rotation of the. eccentric roller 380 to ret,,irn to the position shown, a@.id in so. doing the springs 346 move their respective latch levers @42 c-lockwis@e until their upper pointed ends 349 again engage the right hand wall of the notches 350 in their related armatures and are th- ,reby held in latched position. Prov,'@sion has been made for disabling the tape puirch in case of abnormal condition of tapq, being punched therein, as for examp'@e, tape failure or excessive tape tension. Fiirth-.rmore, the disabling mechanis@-.a includes a conneption to a tape hold-down plate which cqpperates viith the tape feed sprocket so that the punch will be disa'Qled s,iould for any reason the hold-dov.,n plate be moved away from the tape feed sprocket. Specificaliy, a tape hold-dol,,,n plate 385 is mounted to cooperate with the ta e ' ediig sprocket 331. The p i-e hold-down plate 3o5 has an arcuate portion which is adapted to overlie a se.@meit of the tape feeding sprock@,t Nvhich serves to guicle the tape about the sprocket. The plate 385 is carried by a lever 386 which is pivoted on a stud 337 extending from a wall of the punch frame. The lever 386 has a -oin 388 extendin-2 fror@i a face thereof @ and this pin anchors one end of a spridg 389. The s ring 389 p is looped and has its opposite end anchored at a fixed pin 300 which extends from o-rie of the walls of the pilneh. iphe pi@oi points of the spring @89 are @o arran-ed as to. cause the spring to exert an over-center action against the lever 396. Co.nsequently, when the lever 386 is moved in a clock-wise direction about its pivot 387, the spring 389 wiff caus,. the lever to have a po@itive action as it approaches its limit of movement in a clockwise direction@ a-@ld it the-Li exerts a force on the lever to hold it open. In the counterclockwise movement of the lever 396, a sim i'iar action results from the spring 389 whereby the arcua'te portion of the hold-down Plate 385 is held aaainst the feed sprociet 331. Tti@ lower e-id of 'he lever 386 has pivoted thereto a rearwardly exteidin.- arm 391 wfii@h by means of a slot '-19,2 at its opposite e-.@d is coniiect.ed with a stud 393, the stud being located in a downwardt prO7 I , @ y jecting pprtior, of a curved leve,r 394. The lever 394 is mounted for rocking movement abolit a pivot pin 395, and its free er@d 396 includes a laterally bent arm which is adapted to lie in contact wilh the i-ipper surface of a t4pc passing through the plinch. The lever 394 is coiinected by means of a pin 397 with the slot of a rearwardl Y e7-7 tending lever 398. The corific@3fing slot in the levpr 393 affords a limited amount of lost inotion betwee-@l the lever and the piT,, 397. The rear end of the lever 398 is connected by mea-@is of a pin 399 'Lo a bail leve.- 4foO. The bail lever 400 is rneiinted for roc.'@in movement about a 9 pivot pin 401 ext n@-itig from the lower rear corner of the ptinch frame. The baii le'@'er 400 has a transversely ei tending cross member 4fj2 @,vhich terminate in a downwardly ex' ending arn 403 which is adertured to cipbrace the pin 401.' A for@vardi@ 6xteilding- arm 494 of the haff


2,700,446 29 levet is conhected to a flexible contact carrying leaf 405 whereby rocking movement of the arm 404 will make and break a contact PTC. The tape guide roller 330 is carried by an Lipstanding lever 407 which is also pivotedon the pin 401 at the rear 5 lower corner of the punch frame. The lever 401 has a laterally extending bail 408 which extends over the rear edge of the bail lever 400, the arrangement being such that clockwise rocking movement of the upstand-ing lever 407 about the pivot pin 401 will engage the left hand lu end of the lever 398 connected to lever 400 and rock the lever 400 in a clockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 35. This rock@'ng motion of the bail lever 400 is possible by virtue of -le pLq and slot connection at the forward end of the lever 398. The upstanding lever 407 is normally 15 urged in a counterclockwise direction by a spring 409 which connects the lower end of the lever with a fixed frame member. The lever 394 is urged in a counterclock- wise direction about its pivot pin 395 by a spring 410 which interconnects that lever with a pin carried by a fixed 20 frame member. It viill appear from the foregoing that when the hold- down plate 385 is rocked away from the tape sprocket 331 by moving the same in a clockwise direction about its pivot 387, the lower end of the lever will force the rearwardly 25 extendin.- arin 391 toward the rear of the punch until the forward end of the slot 392 engages the stud 393. When the arm 391 has engaged the stud 393, the lever 394 will be rocked about its pivot 395, thereby pulling movement of the bail lever 400 and its associated arm 404 will serve to open the contact PTC. Furtlierniore, when the tape hold-down plate 385 is rocked away from the sprocket 331, the plate 396a will be lifted and thereby po- 35 sition it so that a tape may be readily inserted in the punch. It will appear, therefore, that a control circuit to the punch may be opened when the hold-down plate 385 is rocked away from the tape feed sprocket 331. Should the supply of tape under the free end of the lever 40 394 for any reason fail, the lever 394 will drop under the iniluence of its spring 410, rocking about its pivot pin 395 in a counterclockwise direction. This likewise will exert a pull on the rearwardly extending lever 398 and caus-@ the opcning of the contact PTC in manner similar to that 45 described before. The tension of the tape in contact with the tape roller 330 is normally instifficient to overcome the tension of the spring 409. Should, however, the tension in the tape be increased to the point where the lever 407 is rocked in a clock,@vise direction about its pivot pin 401 5( and a.-ainst the tension of the spring 409, the bail 408 of the lever 407 will operate the bail lever 400 as described and rock the latter in a clockwise direction, thereby break- ing the contact PTC. The PLC contact of the tape punch is operated at each punching cycle by the latch lock bail 55 360, and a bail 379a has a forwardly extending arm which is provided to operate the contact PTC. A molded transparent plastic dome 321a is secured to the die plate 321 to overlie the die openings 320. The dome 321a is adapted to catch the chad punched from the 60 tape, direct it in a lateral direction and guide it into a dis- charge tube 321b. Tape reader After a tape has been punched as hereinabove d,- scribed, 65 the same may be placed into the tape reader 16 for the automatic control of the ivriting machine in the reproduc- tion of the text carried in code by the tape. The details of the tape reader are shown in Figs. 40, 41, 42 and 43 of the drawings. 7( The tape reader includes a plurality of paired electrical contacts 412 which are disposed in opposite rows on a supporting structure 413 which is mounted on a base cast- ing 414. Inasmuch as *,he present device is designed to sense any oiie of six holes, or any combination there4)f, 75 iii the control tape, there are six contacts under the con- trol of tape perforations, a seventh contact constituting a tape run-out contact which will be described in greater de- tail hereiiiafter, and a common contact RCC opei-ative in each reading cycle. The contacts in the oppositely dis- 80 posed rows are arranged on the supporting structure 413 in staggered relation so that they may be individually con- trolled by interposer mechanism which will be more fully described at a later point. Each pair of contact devices consists of a fixed conduct- 85 30 ing strip 415 on one end of which is a contact point, and a resiliently niovable conductidg strip 416 which carries a contact point in registration with the one on the fixed strip 415 with which it is paired. The resilient conducting strip 416 is norrnally biased to close the contact points. Each contact device, however, is held open, except when a corresponding t-,ipe p.-rforation appears, by means of ali offset contact lever 417 wh;ch is mounted for limited swinging movement on a pivot shaft 413 which forms part of the supporting structure 413. Each of the contact levers 417 has a free end 419 which when nioved outwardly causes the contact operating end thereof to move outwardly. The contact operating end of each lever has pivoted thereto a short, outwardly extending projection insulating link 420 which is notched to engage an outwardly extending pin 421 of the associated resilient contact strips 416. As a result of this structure, when the free ends 419 of the contact levers 417 are moved outwardly the opposite ends move outwardly, whereby the contact points on the associated circuit maker are opened. The contact levers 417 are guided in their movement by a pair of guide combs 422, and the movement of these levers is partially under control of a pair of contact lever bails 423, one such bail being associated with each row of contact levers, which are adapted to engage the free ends 419 of the contact levers. Thus, when the contact lever bails 423 are moved toward each other, any contact lever which is at such tin-ie otherwise free will permit its associated resitien@ conducting strip 416 to move inwardly to prised of a pair of spaced arms 425 interconnected by the contact lever bail 423. One end of each arm is pivoted on the pivot shaft 418, and the other end of each has mounted thereon a roller 426. The contact lever bail assemblies are urged toward each other under the influence of the resilient contact springs 416, but they are kept in normally separated position by i-neans of interposer bail studs 427 which ar.- adapted to move between the rollers 426 at each end of the assembly. When the studs 427 are disposed between the rollers 426, the contact lever bail assembly is separated, the contact lever bails 423 are in contact with the free ends of the contact levers 419, and as a consequence the contact points of the circuit makers are opened. The studs 427 are carried by an interposer bail assembly 428 which in turn is pivoted on a pivot shaft 429. The intei@,t)oser bail assembly 428 includes a pair of spaced side arms on the free end of each of which is located the stud 427 and from which it projects into position between the rollers 426. An interposer bail 431 interconnects the side arms of the interposer bail assembly and this bail is adapted to overlie and to control a series of interposers as will more fully appear hereinafter. Furthermore, the interposer bail assembly has attached thereto an interposer bail arm 432 by meaii- of which the forwardly projecting arms 428 Play be rocked aboi-it the pivot shaft 429 on which they are mounted. The 'ree end of the interposer bail arm 432 has a cain follower 433 mounted thereon adapted to operate in contact with an interposer bail cam 434 when the interposer bail arm 432 is released from the influence of a control arm 435, as will be more fully explained hereinafter. The operation of the tape controlled contact assembly is under the ultimate control of a series of interposer arms 437 (Fig. 41), and attached tape reading pins, one such arrn being provided for each tape controlled contact lever. The interposer arms 437 are ireely pivoted on the shaft 429 on which they are mounted, and each consists of a lever having a pair of interposer s oulders 438 (Fig. 42) formed at the free end thereof. One shoulder 438 of each interposer arm will be associated with the free end of its corresponding contact lever. In the inoperative or non-reading position of the device, the interposer arms will be positioned as shown in Fig. 42 of the drawings with one of its shoulders 438 in the path of movement of its associated contact lever, but nornially out of engagement therewith. It will be seeii, therefore, that even though the contact lever bails 423 are released, any contact lever whose interposer arm 437 is in blocking position will be restrained from movement and consequently its associated contacts will remain open. Coupled to each interposer arm is a reading pin 439 which is guided for reciprocating movement in a reading pin guide block 440. The path of the reading pins 439 forward on the '.ever 398 and thereby effectively rocking 30. close the contacts thereof. The contact lever bail assem- the bail lever 400 about its pivot 401. The clockwise bly includes a pair of yoke- like members 424, each com-


intersects a tape feed throat 441 in the gifide block 440. As a pbrforated tape is intermittently fed through the tape feed throat 441, the reading pins 439 are allowed to come into light contact therew:lth by reason Of the fact that each interposer arm 437 is under the influence of a light spring 442. The tension of the spring 442 is insufficient to cause any damage to a control tape being read. However, the spring tension is sufficient to causo a reading pin 439 to enter a tape perforallion in alignment therewith at the read. @ St ing ation. When this relationship is present the corresponding pin 439 will enter the tape perforation, causing the interposer arm 437 to s@ving on its pivol shaft 429 sufficiently to withdraw the blocking intei@Doser shoulder 438 from the path of its associated contact 16ver. Undek these c6nditions wh@-n the contact lever bails 423 are movod inwardly aN,@,ay from the free end,-z of the contact levers, a contact lever thus ireed will w-ove sufficiently to clos6 its associated contact poirits. fn the absence of a perforation in the tape, the reading pins will rest lightly on the surface thereof, thus preventing the associated interposer arms 437 from moving out of the path of their associated contact levers, th-.reby blocking the levers a,gainst movement and avoiding the cideration of their associated contacts. Whenever the interposer bail 431 is in its depressed position, the inerposer arms 437 w-.'Il be held in non-reading position. It will be noted that the intetpo8er bail 4'31 overlies and is adapted to contact the upper edge of the aligned interposer arms. The interposer arms 437 and conseq@,iently the reading pins 439 are retained in non- reading position by the interposer bail 431 until the interposer bail arm 432 is released by the control arm 435. Such release follows energization of a control magnet RM in connection with which operates an ari-.iature 445 which is pivoted on a stub shaft 444 aiid about which the armature may rock. The coiitr6l ar@n 435 is likewise i)ivoted on the stub @haft 444. The armature 445 is a bifurcated structure having a laterally, extending s'op fin.aer 446 adapted to limit its rocking movement about the shaft 444 by contact with P.n armature yoke 447. A second extension 448 of the arn,ature structure lies substantially pp@rallel but in spaced relation in respect to the stop finger 446, aiid the free end of this latter extension mounts a cam following roller adapted to contact an armature knock-o.f cam 4,a9. A spring 450 -.iormally biases the armature 445 away from the core of th.- control magnet RM, but in order to render the action of the armature 445 positive in overcoming residual magnetism in the core, the armature knock-off cam 449 is arranged to positively rock the arn-iature away from the core immediately after the energizin@ impulses. The cam 449 is so designed that it oberates to hold the armature away from its core for a del@inite and predetermined time during each cycle, thiis insiiring that in starting operation of the reader the interpo-.ers will not be released at a point in the rotation of shaft 453 where an abnormal contact operation would resuit. The conjoint action of the control arm 435 and the armature 445 is achieved by the us-- ol' an ihtercoiinecting sdring 451 and the relative adj:ustment 6f the two members is achieved throiigh an adjusting screw 452 inoui-ited in a flenge of the control arm in such position as t6 contact the free end of the armature' The i-,iterposer cam 434 and the armattire knock-off cam 449 as well as a tape feed cam, as will appear hereinafter, are riiouhted 'ior r6tation with d power shaft 453 which is driven throi@gh gears 24 and 25 (Fig. 2). The pb,,ver shaft 453 and consequent,ty the cpms thercbn a@-e coiltinuou ly rotated but tape reading operations are not perfotmed iintil the c-ontr6l magnet RM- is eiiergized. When an eriefgizing clirrent is Drese-it in the control magnet Ri\l, the arrpqture 445 is ait@acted to the magnet core with the result that the control arm 435 is rocked in a clbck-@vise directiop, thereby releasing the interposer bail arm 432 ' Tb-. interposer bail arm d,32 is under the inflllence of a sprin.- 454 (,Fi@-. 40) ivhich is effective to draw tiie cam follower 433 of the interposer bail arm i-.ito contact viith the interposer b-,iil cam e,34. As the bail cam 434 rotates, the interpos--r bail arm 432 abbut the i)ivol shaft 4;,9 4nd -aises the iiiter- j,ost-,r b-i.ii -,ssemb'@3, 431,. As a @estilt of th;.@ actior, tho interposers 437 ard p@riiiited to unde.- the in@qiiefite of,their respect@ve springs 442, a,.id the reading pihs 439 Nvill en',&r any t:@pe verf6ratiorig ibat ir(@ presented in ali,gr,im-@it Nv'ilh the respective pins. 6ne or more of the pins enters a perforation in the tape, the inte@rposei 2,7100,446 -32 437 associated th:erewifh rises sufficiently to free the inierpose@ shoulder 438 from blocking ehgagehient in the path of its associated coiatact lever 419 so that when the inerposer studs 427 itbve froni bbtween the contact lever bail roliers 426, the contact lever, or levers, thus freed of the interposer shbulders Will n@ove inwardly -under the iiiffuenc@e cif th6 resilient @ontact strip 416 and permit contacts of such operated coiitact le@;er, or levers, to close. 10 As the ihterposer bail cam 434 r6tates and its high point rides in contact with the interposer bail cam follower 433, the interposer bail arm assembly is rocked in a countercldc'4wist directioji about it@.pivot shaft 429 and the control arm 435 is moved inwardly under the in- 15 fluence of the spring 451 (Fig. 40) so as to be in po@ition to intercept the latch end of the interposer bail arm 432 as it is lowerod, thereby holding it out of further contdct with the interposer bail cain 434 and sustaining it against the infltience of ihe spring 454. In this position 20 '@he reading mechanism will a-Ain be latched, the interposer bail 431 ha@iing lowered the interp6ser akrhs 437 int6 contact lever blocking po8ition and th6 contact levers havi-Tig b@-en separated by contact with the contact lever bails 423 u@on soparation of the contact 1-.ver b@il as- 25 sembly sti-uctlire by the interpo@er bail studs 427. A second tape reading operation cannot follo , therefore, @V until the control ma.-net RM is I once again energized. However, when the control magnet RM is continu6usly energized the reader operates continifously, reading a new 30 code for each revol@ation of shaft 453. The common contact RCC under cortrol of the arm 425a is permitted to operate during oach reading (@ycle. The extension 425a is a downward extension of a bail arm 425. The perforations in the tape are arranged in transverse 35 rows that are oqually spaced, and it is wntemplated,- therefore, that as the tape is moved through the r6ading throat 441 in step-by-step progression, the successive rbws of perforations will present thomselves at the reading zone in alignment with the reading pins. For the pur- 40 po@e of achievi-@ig a regulated feeding oi' the tape through the reading zone there ha8 been brovided a tade feeding mechanism which is shown in detail in Fig. 43 of th6 dra@vings to which reference rnay no-,v be hz@d. The tap@ i,@ provided alon.a its lengtli with s@rocket holes with 45 wiiich the teeth of a pin wheel 455 are adapted to engage for feeding the tape through the reading throat 441. The pin wheel 455 is carried by a shaft 456 which is rotatod in a bearing in the support casting by a feed ratchet wheel 457. The feed ratchet wheel 457 hfts peripheral 50 teoth which are periodically engaged by a feed pawl 458 for rotating the feed ratchet wheel as may be reqiiired for the proper feeding of the tape. The feed pawl 458 i@ pivoted on a stud 459 cartied at one end of a feed pa,@vl operating lever 460. The operating lever is mounted ofi r, 3 the pivot shaft 429 for limited rocking movi@tn6iit there- about and it includes a, feed pa@,vl operating arm 461 oti the free end of which is mounted a carn follower 462 adapted to contact a tape feed cam 463 mounted for rotation with the power shaft 453. The fted pawl op- 60 erating qssembly incliides a transvetse tape feed yoke 464 extehding b@,-tweeii the fi@ed pawl opi@rating arra 46il aiid an extension 465 to which the feed pawl 458 is pivoted. The f-eed pawl 458 is moved throligh its feeding stroke by means of a relatively strong spring 458a which has 63 one end thereof attached to the pawl and the other end the@e6f to a pin fixed in the support casting. It will ap@pear, therefore, that when6ver the feed pawl operating assembly is free to rock about the pivot shaft 429, the end of the feed pawl 458 will be fbrced into operating en- 'i 0 gagement with the teeth of the feed ratchet wheel 457 under the nflLlence of the operatin@ spring 458a. A feed pawli stop 466 is carried by the feed pawl operating assembly exter@sion 465 in such 1)ositibn as to limit tt.@e clockwise inovement of the fedd pa-wl 458. The 75 support castin@ carri6s a stop 467 which is positioned to lirqit the counterclockivist@ movemtnt of the feed pawl 458. BetN,,ie---Il the two stops 466 and 467 the feed pawl 4@;g is ther@-fore restraiiied to -a pted&te@r,7itiod path of moverr@ert as it functions to driv6 the fb6d ratchet bO .vheel 457. Restoration 6'L the f@ed pawl 458 to inoperative position is under the infflience of the tape f6ed cam 463. V@hen the tape feed cam 463 rotates with its high point in contact with its cam follower 462, the feed p@,i@VI 453 85 is withdrawn to its inoperative positibn.


2,700,446 33 In order that the tape feed mechanism may be operative only @vhen tape reading is desired, there has been provided a feed pawl latch 463 which is pivoted for rocking movement about a pivot shaft 469. The feed pawl latch 468 is urged to rock about its shaft 469 in a counterclockwise direction under the influence of a spring 470, but the same is normally held against such rocking movement by one of the contact lever bails 423. Pivoted on the feed pawl latch 468 is a latch control lever 471 @vhich has an extension 472 normally adapted to lie in contact with one of the contact lever bails 423. The spring 470 intere6nnects the feed pawl latch 468 and its control lever 471 so that clockwise movement of the control lever 471 imparted thereto by the contact lever bail 423 is transmitted to the feed pawl latch. The feed pawl latch has a hookcd free end 473 adapted to engage over a shoulder 473a provided on the e-@ld of the feed pawl operating assembly 461. It will appear, therefore, that as the feed pawl operating assembly is rocked into inoperative position under the influence of the tape feed cam 463, and as the contact lever bail 423 moves outwardly, the hooked end 473 of t-lie feed pawl latch 468 will engage over the shoulder of the member 465 and hold the feed pawl operating assembly in inoperative position. Upon the next succeeding tape readin-, operation the contact lever bails 423 will n-iove inwardly, thereby releasin.- the control lever 471 and permitting separation of the feed pawl latch 463 and the shoulder under the influence of a feed pawl latch spring 474. This will free the feed pawl operating as'emb'IY for a tape feeding operation. The timing of the respective parts is such that the reading of the perforation iii the tape by the reading pins 439 takes place during the first part of the cycle and the feeding of the tape takes place during the latter part of the cycle. A feed ratchet wheel detent 475 is pivoted on the stipport casting by means of a pivot screw 476, and it is rocked in a clockwise direction under the influence of , spring 477 so that a roller 478 on the free end of the detent arm is in contact with the teeth of the feed ratchet wheel 457, thereby providing a stabilizing influence for the rotary operation of the feed ratchet wheel a-.-id consequently its associated tape feeding pin wheel. In order that the tape may be held in cooperative relation with the pin viheel 455, there has been provided ,i 'Lape hold-down arm 479 which has an arcuate surface 480 disposed in proximity to the pin wheel 455 and which serves the purpose of holding the tape in contact with the crl pins of the pin wheel. in order that threading of the tape may be facilitated the tape hold-dowli arm 479 is pivoted for rocking move , r--e-.it on the pivot shaft 429. By virtue of the pivotal of the tape hold-down arm, it may be rocked a,@,,ay froin the pin wheel 455, thereby exposing the pin wheel to facili'tate threading of the tape thereabout. li is, of course, desirable that a tape run-out contact be opened and retained in (jpen position while the tape ho'id-dowii arm 479 has been rocked away from the pin wheel 455 and to the end that a contact RTC may be opened and held against inadvertent closure during tape threadin.- operations, there has been provided a cammi'n suri-ace 432 on an inwardly projecting portion of the ta-oc hold-down arin. The camming surface 482 is so disposed in relation to a tape run-out contact lever stud 463 that upon rocking of the tape hold-down arm into its open position, it will contact the stud 483 and move the lower end of a tape run-out contact lever 484 in a counterclockwise direction, thus opening the contacts RTC. In order that the tape hold-down arm be somewhat positively held i@l both its open and in its closed position, there is provided a spring loop 485 which has one e@ad '(hereof attached to a stud 486 extending from the face of an extension finger 487 forming part of the ta@,)c liold-down arm assembly. The other end of the sp@i@ig loop is attached to a stud 488 fixed in and exter.,ding from the base casting. When the tape holdarm is in its closed position, as shown in Fig. 43, the sli@ing bow 485 exerts a clockwise force against the c,,.te@ s-ion 437 and thereby moves the arcuate portion 480 go a re show.,a i-ii the .irawin-s in Icheir inaclive o- latched of @ile tape hold-down arm against the pin wheel 455. p ositions 7vhere they a.re at t'iie end of thpir movertient V@lher, the tape hold-down arm is swung into the open to @vard the riglit as viewed in Fig. 45. Iii the latter view, Dositic-@i, the spring bow 485 tends to force the extension th e bar PB I is shown as p@-ovided with an integrally formed finger @A7 in a counterclockwise direction, thus tending lu g 506 having a latching point 507 engaging the left to hold the tape hold-down arm,in its open position. 85 h and end of a groove 508 lori-,ied @'ii the outer end of the 34 It wffl appear from the foregoing, therefore, that the tape controlled contacts 412 are permitted to close when a tape reading pin 439 associated with a contact lever 417 enters a perforation in the tipe. Several sets of contacts are in certain instances under the contro', of each contact lever, and the aggregate force of the resilient contact strips 416 is considerable. It will follow from the foregoin.- description and explanation that the interposer structure sustains this force and avoids transmission there- 10 of to the reading pins; even though the reading pins are the ultimate control instrument for the pin controlled contacts, there is only the force of the interposer spring 442 imposed on the reading pin 439 with the result that the reading pins offer no obstruction to the even passage 15 of the tape through the reading zone. The tape may con sequently be used repeatedly without fear of damage 'o'r undue wear by contact with the reading pms. Translator 20 As explained hereinabove, the keys composing the keyboard of the writing machine are selectively actuated by means of a translator which is located under the keyboard and which is under the control of code designations recorded in the columns of a tape in the tape read- 25 ing unit 16. 'rhe translator is of the type known in this art as a mechanical translator; i. e., the type bars of the writing machine are operated from the power roll 21 under control of their key levers, and the selection of the key lever 30 'Lo be operated is made by the relative positioning of longitudinally slidable p@- rmutation members of the translator, The relative positioning of the permutation members is controlled electrically by the sensed code designation in the tape. The translator is disclosed in detail in 35 Figs. 3, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48 and 49, inclusive. 'fhe translator comprises generally six code or permutation bars corresponding, respectively, to the six positions of a predetermined code system. These bars are indicated respectively, by the reference characters PBI to 40 PB6, inclusive. The translator also comprises six selector magnets TMI to TM6 controlling, respectively, the relative positioning of the six permutation bars PBI to PB6, and a plurality of seeker members 489 corresponding, respectively, to the keys com-nosing the main keyboard of 45 the machine. The seekers 489 function to actuate their respective key levers, each seeker member 489 comprising an tipper hooked end 490 engaging a stud 491 on the side of its corresponding key lever and being adapted to be pulled down to operate such key lever. The translator also includes an operating or power shaft 492 hav- 50 ing control cams 493, 494 and 495, mounted thereon, and the translator also comprises mechanism operated by the cams for effecting a cycle of operation during which the sele6ted key lever is actuated and the parts then 55 restored to a normal or inactive position. As shown, the six pertrutation bars PBi to PB6, inclusive, are arranged horizontally and extend transversely benealli the keyboard ancl in spaced parallel relation with respect to one another. The permutatioii bars are sup- 60 ported at their two ends for limited longitudinal sliding movenient by vertically disposed end comb plates 496 45) suitably fixed to side flange rr@embers 497 of a mai-ii frame plate and being gliided intermediate their eids by vertical comb plates 493 and 499 also suitably 65 fixed 'Lo the frame. Suitable te7ision springs 500 serve to hold ii-itegral projections 501 of the bars against the front wail of the guide slots of the intermediate comb plates 498 and 499. Each perriiutatioi bar is -iiormally urged to move to the leit as viewed in F-g. 45 by a corre- 70 @pondin- compression spring 502 surro@nding an operating piii 503 which is slidably motinted in spaced flanges 504 of a brac@--et at the right hand s-ide of the t,,nit, each such pin 503 engagiiig the i-i@- ht hand end of its correspording permiitatio@i bar. Each pei-inutation bar of the 75 group PBI to PB6, inclusive, is normally held in an inac- tive or latched positioii a-ainst tfie force of its related 'by mealis o' a correspondcompression spring 502 ing arma.ture 505 of a correspor-,din,@ selector r@iagnet of the group Tt,,I'@ to TAY16, incl-Lisive. The perliliita@.igl ba@


2,700,446 35 pivoted arr@iature 509 of its related selector magnet TMI. It will be appreciated that each of the other permutation bars is provided with a similar latching lug 506 which engages a similar groove 508 in the armature 509 of its related translator selector magnet. From the foregoitig it will be apparent that when any one of the selector riiagnets of the group TMI to TM6 is energized, its related armature is attracted, thereby releasing its related permu- tation bar of the group PBI to PB6, inclusive, and each such released bar is then moved longitudinally toward 10 the left as viewed in Fig. 45 by its related compression spring 502 and until a lug 510 formed thereon engages a normally stationary restoring bail 511. All released permutation bars are returned at the end of each operat- ing cycle of 'Lhe translator to their latched positions by 15 means of the restoring bail 511, the latter being mounted on a lever 512 a@id being operated by a follower lever 512a engaging the cam 493 on the power shaft 492 (Figs. 44 and 49). The maiiner in which the permutation bars are returned and relatched will be presently described in de- 20 tail. There is one seeker for each of the key levers of the keyboard. As shown in Figs. 3 and 48, the seeker mem- bers 439 extend downwardly from their related key levers and the straight lower ends 513 thereof are arranged trans- 25 versely of the six peri-niitation bars PBI to PB6, inclusive, and the seekers are dis.Dosed at the sides of the bars Nvhich are opposite to that occupied by the translator selector magnets T@,41 to TM6, inclusive. The seeker members 489 are ma-intai-@led against movement in a direction ex- 30 tendiiig lengthwise of the pernutation bars by spaced upper and lower comb plates 514 and 515, - respectively, which are forned as integral flanges of a r@gid frame plate 516 extending transversely beneath the @eyb.a,d. Th,, Lipper comb plate 514 is bent over as indicated at 517 905 to provide a means for holding a rod 516 which extends transversely of and beneath the key levers and serves both as a fulcrum and as a retainirig means for the u.Dper ends of the seeker members 489, each of the seeker mem- bers being formed with a lug 519 which is adapted to 40 engage the unders,' de of rod 518 and thereby limit upward movement of such seeker member 489. A tension spring 520 connects each seeker member 489 with a flange 521 of a fixed frame plate 522 and thereby constantly il-rges its related seeker 489 against a seeker positioning bail 45 523, the latter extending transversey across all of the seeker members and being connected at its tv.,o outer ends, respectively, to the lower ends of a pair of arms 524 which are in tiirn pivotally supported at their upper ends to the ends of the fixed support rod 518. There are two 50 cams 495 (Fig. 44) identica, with one aiother, and they are carried, respectively, on opposite epds of the power shaft 492 and at points adjacent the two arms 524. Each of the arms 524 carries a follower roller 526 which is held in continuous engageri-ient with a related one of the -" @5 cams 495 by the tension springs 520 holding the seeker members 489 against the positioning bail 523. The tnvo cams 495 function as positioning means for the bail 523 and the seeker members 489. In the normal or inactive position of the translator, the cams 495 hold the posi- Go tioning bail 523 in the position shown in Fig. 3, thereby holding the lower straight ends 513 of the seekers 489 out of seeking relation with respect to the permutation bars PBI to PB6, inclusive. As indicated by the showing of per.-nutation bar PBI C-5 in Fig. 45, the longitudinal edge thereof facing the seeker members 439 is foriiied as a series of tabs 527 which be- forc assembling may be removed by a suitable tool; and, when so removed, provide permutation slots 528. The remaining permutation bars are similarly formed. Eacl@l 7,0 seeker member is disposed opposite either a tab 527 or a slot 528 in each permutation bar, when such bar is both in its latched and in its released position. In a manner Nvhich is well knov@ii in this art, the tabs 527 of the six permutation bars are perr@iutatively removed according to a predetermined plan so that for each positional relation- ship of the six permutation bars, the lower straight edge 5:43 of only one of the seeker members 489 at any given time v!ill be oposite a slot 529 in each of the six bars and such one seeker member is, therefore, the only one that 50 can be operated, for actuating its related key in response to the code designation which effects such positional rela- tionshi,o of the bars. The code designations used in the illustra@ted embodimer@t for effecting the different relative positions of the permutation bars for operating the typp- writer keys appear at the top in Fi@. 50 and in Fig. 52. As an example, it is noted that i-ev has noted i-a connect-on therewith 'che translator co-d, 3-4-5. This means that when the p,-rmiitation bars PB3, PB4 and PB5 are released by the ener-iziiig of their related selector mag-Liets TM3, TNi4 and respectively, and with all other permutatior. bars remaining in 1,1-ieir latched position, the lower ed-e 4,;9 of the seeker member attache-,'I to the M key lever will be opposite a slot in each of the six perrn-.jtatio-n bars, a@ld no other see'-cer mewber will be opposi'Le a contintious verti-@al roiv of such slo,s. AL a selecled point in each cycle of operation of the translator, the cams 495 and springs 520 will provide for movement of the positioning bail 523 1,0 the left as viewed iii Fig. 48 so that 'Lhe seeker rin;@mb@-rs 499 rray pivot aliout the rod 518 and tl-@e lower ords 513 the,-eof mai move into seeking- r-lationship with respect to ' he six permutation bars. The seeker member 489 which is opposite a cor,.Linuous vertical row of slots @-)26 in the permutalion bars will then move into such verti-.al row of slots a-@id all other seekers will be stopped by a tab 527 in oie or more of the permutation bars. T-he sele--ted seeker '89 which moves into the conti-iiuous row of slots, moves far enough -]'or a ledge por'lion 529 thereon to be beneath and ip the path of an operating bail The operating bail 530 exterids across all of the seeker members 489 and is fixed at its two ouler ends, respectively, to a pair of operating bail levers 531. The two bail levers 531 are pivoted, respectively, on fixed sttids 532 projecting inwardly from the translator frame. Each bail lever 531 is composed of two parts (Fi.@@ 48), one part 533 carrying the operating bail 530 and the other part 534 bein,- adjustably sccured by a suitable means i.dicated at 535 to the part 533 and carryin- a follower roller 536 enga.-ing an operating cam 495. . As shown in Fig. 44, there are two such cams 495 engaged, respectively, by the two rollers 536 of the two bail levers 534 and each bail lever 534 is kept in enga.-ement with its related operating cam by a tension spring 537 connecting an extension of each lever 534 and a pin 530 of the fixed transverse frame plate 521. From the foregoing, it wiU be apparent that during each- revolution of the power shaft 492, which con-iprises an operating cycle of the translator, and after the cams 495 have positioned a selected seeker 489 beneath the operating bail 530, the cams 494 and springs 537 will provide for moving the bail levers 533 clockwise z,@.s viewed in Fig. 48 and during such movement the operating bail 530 will engage and pull down the selected sceker niember 499 and thereby pull down the key lever to which such selected seeker is attached. From the foregoing description of the power mechanism it will be apparent that such downward movement of the related key lever wiL' result in actuating the related key by tripping its r-,lated cam unit 31 (Fig. 3). In the illustrated embodiment, the cams 495, throtigh the springs 520 and positioning bail 523, move the seekers 489 into seeking relationship with the six pern-iutation bars at the outset of the operating cycle of the tropslator shaft 492 and move such seekers out o'L seek-.n.@ relationship near the end of each such cycle. The operating bail cams 495 start moving the selected seeke.member 489 downward soon after movement of the p--sitioning bail 523. The operating bail 530 is restored to its inactive position near the end of each cycle. The positioning bail 523 disconnects the selected seek@@r -4.39 rom the operating bail 530 when tne seekers are engaged by the bail 523 just before the restoration of th-@ operating bails 530. Each operating cycle of the translator is in,'@tiated by engaging the translator clutch 539 which is the same as the clutch shown in Figs. 33 and 34. Wben the clutch 539 is engaged, it connects the gear 26 to the trensla'or shaft 492. The translator shaft 492 is rotated for o-lic revolution and is then disconnected from the powe,@.source by disengagement of the clutch 539. As statecl each revolution of the shaft 492 provides j'or one operating cycle of the translator. The clutch 539 is e-@igacej by the ener- izing of the iranslator clutch magiei TC'f@@ It is to be noted that four of the selector magnets shovv-ll in Fig. 45 are arranged in pairs with the outer e-,lds of,: the armatures 509 of each pair disposed in ali-rirr,-e@it v,,ilh each other. It will be appreciated that a third @-pae-iiei is arranged with each pair to present its arinatuire i-@-i overlapping staggered relation to the armattires of the


37 paired magnets. A restoring and knock-off bail 540 is associated with each set of three armatures. The knock- off bails 540 are suitably pivoted on fixed studs 541 and each bail comprises a first bail element 542 extend- ing across the magnet side of each of its associated 5 armatures 509, and also comprises a second bail element 543 disposed above and across its associated armatures and coacting with the rear or right hand edge of the lugs - 506 carried by the permutation bars corresponding to the three armatures and selector magnets with which such 7,0 knock-off bail is associated. Each knock-off bail is urced toward the position shown in Fig. 45 by a tension spring 544. Each armature 509 is pivoted on an up- standin.- fixed rrember 545 and is urged away from its related coil by a tension spring 546. 15 Tlle knock-off bail 540 coacts with the restorin.- bail 511 to relatch the permutation bars PBI to PB6, inclu- sive, at the end of an operating cycle of the translator. As shown in l,ig. 45, the lug 510 on any permutation bar will engage the bail 511 when released by the ener- 20 gizing of its related. selector magnet. Near the end of each revolution of the shaft 492, the restoring bail cam 493 will start moving the follower 493a counterclock- wise as viewed in Fi-.. 49. The follower 493a will then move the bail lever 512 clockwise as viewed in Fig. 45, 25 and the ba,,l 511 will start restoring movement, to the right, of any of the permutation bars which were previ- ously i7eleased. The restoring bail 511 will engage the restoring lugs 510 on the permutation bars which were not previotisly released, and then the bail 511 will move 30 all six of the permutation bars to the right as viewed in Fig. 45. The rear edges of the lugs 506 on the permu- tation ba.-s engage the bail elements 543 of their corre- spondi,ig knock-off bails 540. The restoring bail 511 will continue to move the permutation bars to the ri-ht 35 as viewed iii Fig. 45, until the knock-off bails 540 @re r@iovcd clockwise and their bail elements 542 engage and move outward any of their related armatures which are stuck-, thereby ossliring the engagement of the latching points 507 of the lugs 506 on the periputation bars 40 within the slots 508 of the related armatures 509. The springs 546 ivill then hold all armatures 509 against the lugs 501. The restoring bail 511 will start a counter- clockwise movement back to the inactive position shown, with the result that the permutation bars PBI to PB6, 45 inclusive, and the knock-off bails 540 will follow the re- storing bail in its return niovem6nt until the latching point 507 of the lug 506 of each permutation bar en- gages the latching left hand end of the slot 508 ol@: its related armature 509. ti Tape punching and reading circuits In order to operate the tape punch, the Punch On switch mtist be pressed, and with the switch in this posi- tion, the writing machine key levers cannot be operated unless there is a supply of tape properly inserted in the ptinch. This is because the key lever lock magnet KLM niust be energized to allow key lever operation, and with the puuch switch on, the eilergizing circuit for mag- net KLM inc'ludes the punch tape contact PTC. This c,,) con' act PTC is in the tape punch unit and is closed only whe n tti,--re is tape in the punch and there is not excessive tens ion oji the tape between the punch and the tape sup ply spool. A contact closed when the punch switch is off allows the key lever lock magnet to be energized 65 reg ardless of whether the contact PTC is open or closed. All circ-ciits controllin,@ the punching of the tape in- clud e the tape contact PTC, the contact points closed by punch switch in its on position and the normally clos ed points of the p@,inch lock contact PLC. The con- 70 tact PLC is operated momentarily during the first part of the cycle of operation of the tape punch, and the nor- mall y closed poii-its of contact PLC are tungsten circuit bre akers provided to eliminate arcing from other contact poin ts in the eirei-iit. 75 in feeding 'Lape through the punch by punching only the small feed holes, the tape feed switch lever is pressed to close the normally open points of this switch and ene rgize the punch clutch magnet PCM. This will cause cont inuous cycles of operation of the punch as long as 80 the tape feed switch is held dcpressed even though the eiier gization of magnet PCM is momentarily interrupted eac h cycle by the operation of contact PLC. In the automatic operation of the tape punch by the writ ing machine through the code selector, the selector 85 ,!1700,"e 38 common contact SCC is operated by every selector slide, and the closin.- of these cor@tact points establishes a circuit to the commoii side of @,,Il the selector code contacts SCI, SC2, SC3, SC4, SC5 and SC6. This circuit incltides the prev;ously i- ne@ntioned norr@ially closed poid-ts of cont,,ct P'@C and also the normally closed points of a transfer contact on an anti-repeat relay ARR. This circuit further extends frorr@ these normally closed points of the relay transfer contact through another normally closed con,act on relay ARR to the punch clutch ma.-Det PCM. Thus, ,he punch clutch magnet is energized and the closiig of certain ones of the selector code contacts ',o the j)articular slide which is operated causes er,.er.-izatio-ri ol the corresponding punch code magnets PMI, PM2, PT@ri3, PM4, PMS and PM6 to which th-, selector code contacts are respectively connecled. As the punch operates, the transfer coiitact PLC is operated 'Lo close its normally open points and complete a circuit for eriergizing relay ARR and the operation of contact PLC also breaks the energizin.- circuit for the punch cluitch magnet and the punch code magnets. The contact PLC returns to its normal position at aboul riiidpoiiit iii the p-Lincli cycle, and in this return movement, the movable contact engages the norn-ially closed points before breaking th.- normally open points. Thus, if the selector common contact SCC is still closed, the antirepeat relay ARR is held energized throu.@h the normally open points of its own transfer contact, and wi'il remain ene.-gized as long as contact SCC remains closed to prevent ener.-ization of ihe putich r@ia.@nets even though contact PLC has retir,-ied to Porr,.ial. This prevents a repeat operat;on of the punch regardless of how long the selectDr contacts are held cl-osed. A code relay CR is us,-d for deleting a code in the tape and also for punching a stop code. This relay is provided with seven iiornially oi)eii contacts, and @'s energized by pressin.- either the code delete switch or the stop code switcl@i. When the code delete switch is pressed, a circuit is established through the normally closed points of the tape feed switch coiitacts, and through a normally opei conta-.t of relay R to th,- two movable conlacts of relay ARR the same as w@ie,-i the selector common contact SCC is closed. This energizes the punch clutch nia@net PCM through the normally closed contact of relqy ARR, and alsc) energizes the punc-ti code magnets P4, P5 ancl P6 th.- ough three i-iormqlly op-@,-l contacts on i-elay CR wliich are all con@iecled to the nori- nally closed poiits of the t@ans'er contact of relay ARR the same as -.-lector coitacts SC4, SC5 and SC6. At the same time, puiich cc)de magnets Pl, P2 and P3 ire en.-rgized through respective ilorm,,illy open contacts of relay CR which are all cotinected throuah another iiormally closed contact on relay ARR and through normally closed points of the transfer coiitact operated by the stop code switch. ThLis the pressing of the code delete switch causes a punch operation in whicli all the six code holes are punclied the same as if a selector slide were operated to close all the si7, selector code contacts. However, only one punch cycle will occur regardless of how lon.- the code dele,,C lever is held depressed. This is because the anti-repeat relay AIZR will be energized during this punch cycle ard wiil be held energized through the nor@nally open contact ol- r-,Iay -'R as lon.- as the switch is held d,-pressed in the sarr@e manr@er as relay ARR is held energized through the selector conimon contact SCC. However, if it is desired to rapidly delete a series of codes without pressing and releasing the delete switch once for each code, bolh the delete switch and the tape feed switch may be pr,-ssed simultaneously. These two switches are located adjacent eacli other in the front panel and both may be easily pressed by placing the finger in a position to overlap both switch levers. This simultaneotis operation oi. the twe, svvitches causes the punch to punch all six holes in the tape, btit as the normally closed points of the tape feed switch are now open, the holding circuit for relay ARR is rpen and the relay is deenergized at the eiid of each punch cycle. This perinits the punch to operate continuously and punch code delete holes as long as both switches are depressed, In punchin.- a stop code into tne tape, the stop code switch only is depressed. T@'iis energizes relay CR by closing the normally open points of the stop code switch to cause a single cycle of operation of the punch and to hold relay ARR energized as long as the switch is held depressed. The circuits for accomplishing this sin.-le


'@,700,446 39 punch cycle are the same as when the code delete switch is pressed. However, -,viien the stop code switch is pressed, the normally closed points of this switch are opened to prevent energization of punel'i cod-. magnets PMI, PM2, and PM3. Thus, only ptinch code rnagnets PM4, PM5 5 and PM6 are energized to punch the stop code into the tape. A punch common contact PCC on the tape punch is connected in parallel with the selector common contact SCC in tii-, energizing circuit for the punch clutch ma.-- 0 net PCM. This contact FCC is closcd whenever any one or more oi' the punch lever latches is tripped by ener- -ization of the associated ones of the punch code mag- ,-iets. TI-ie elosing of contacl PCC will cause a punch cycle to ocetir by energizing ma,-net PCM - regardless of 1.3 @vhether or not the selector contact SCC is closed. Con- tact PCC thus acts to i-.isure an operation of the punch in the evei@t the selector contact SCC is closed for a short' interval which is stifficient to trip the punch lever latches but insufficient to engage the clutch. 20 Each rotation of the reader shalt cai operate to sense the code holes in the tape and subsequently feed the tape to the next reading positioi, btit this operation only occurs when the reader ma.-net RM is energized. E- @ier- ,-ization of magnet RM is controlled both manually and 25 automatically by -,i reader control relay RCR aid a dela y coptrol relay DCR. The reader cannot be opetated unless the tape hold-down arm is in a position to hold the tape against the pin wheel and therebv allow the tape contact -'@TC to close. i 30 Each of the reader code contacts RCI, RC2,. RC3, RC4, RCS and RC6 have, normally open points which are connected to . control the ener-ization of the corre- sponding translator code magnets TMI, TM2, TM3, TM4, TM5 and TM6. A reader common co-.itact RCC is closed 35 whenever any of t'ne code contacts are allowed to close and this common contact RCC controls the energization of the translator clutch magnet TCM. Wben the start read switch is pressed, a circuit for energ;zing relay RCR is completed through the normally 4( open points of the trainsfer contacts of this switch and the normally closed contact of the stop read switch Relay RCR has a holding circuit through its normally open contact in series with this normally closed contact of the stop read switch. This holding circuit is controlled by a code translating arrangement of reader contacts ,A,hereby the holding circuit is opened when the reader reads the 4-5-6 sl@OP code. Thus, this arrangement of reader contacts comprises normally open points on con- tact RC3 and normally closed points on contacts RC4, RC5 and RC6. These four contacts are all connected i-,i multipl.- so that the holding circuit for relay RCR is opened only when the reader reads code holes 4, 5 and 6 without reading code hole 3. All other codes used: - ,vh-'ch include 4, 5 and 6 also include 3 so that no other code except 4-5-6 -,vill open the holding circuit for relay 5a RCR. When the start read switch is allowed to return to nor- mal position, a circuit is completed for energizing magnet RM through the normally closed points of the start read 60 switch, through the normally closed carriage return and tab contacts CRTC, through the normally closed back space contacts BSC, through the normally closed points of relay DCR, and through the normally open contacts of relay RCR which is now energized. The reader then 65 functions to read codes punched in the tape and by ener- -izing the translator magnets accordingly causes auto- rnatic operation of the writing machine keyboard. When a 4-5-6 stop code is read the holding circuit for relay RCR will be opened and operation of the reader will be 70 stopped by deenergizing magnet RM. In this case, oper- ation of the reader can be resumed only by pressing the start read switch. The execiition of the carriage return, tabulating and back space operations of the writing machine requires 73 a longer pi@riod of time than the time between readin- si-iccessive codes in the tape. Accordingly, the reader is stopped upon reading any one of these codes and is again started only after the writing machine has completed its function. The stopping of the reader is accomplished 80 by assigning codes to these carriage return, back space and tabulating operations which have a common charac- teristic. Thus when a 5-6 code is read without the 4 code, circuit is com a pleted to energize relay DCR through qor- 85 45 40 ma@y open pqints on reader contacts RC6 and RCS, through norrrially closed points on reader contacts RC4, and through norfnally open contaels on relay RCR which is energized when the reader is operatin@. The energization of relay DCR deenergizes nagnet RM to stop the feader, and after the reader contacts return to normal, relay DCR remains energized through its own normally open contact points and through the contacts CRTC and BSC. Contacts CRTC are opened during a carriage return or tabulating operation of the machine and likewise contacts BSC are opened during a back space operation of the machine. Both contacts close at the completion of their respective machine operations. Accordingly, relay DCR is deenergized as soon as the carriage return, tabulatina or back space operation starts, but the magnet RM is not energized to resume reader operation until the machine operation is completed and contacts CRTC and BSC are closed. It wiU be noted that the pick-up circuit as well as the holding circuit for relay DCR includes the contacts CRTC and BSC. This insures that relay DCR will not become locked energized in the event contacts CRTC or BSC should complete their cycle of operation before the reader contacts comT)Ilete their cycle of operation. Operation of the reader may be stopped at any titne by pressing the stop read switch to deenergize relay RCR. In this case, reader oi)eration can be resumed only by pressing the start read switch. Operation of the reader i3ckay also be stopped by pressin- the start read switch to open the circuit to magnet RM, but in this case, the reader wifl resume operation upon release of the switch. This latter operation allows the reader to be stepped under control of the operator by alternately pressin.- and releasing the start read switch. In the present reader circuits, considerable apparatus is saved and greater reliability is o@btained by the selection of codes for certain non-printing machine functions which may be distinguished from other codes by a simple reader contact arrangement. In other words, the reader automatically stops itself without the use of auxiliary code translating relays whenever certain code combinations are read. From the foregoing it will be seen that the machine is assembled of various combinations of substantially selfcontained units all mounted on or within a common main chassis. In particular, these units include the power frame assembly 12, the carriage and rail assembly, the code seli@ctor 13, the code translator 14, the tape punch 15 and the tape reader 16. Because the separate units are capable of easy assembly into the machine, there is imparted to the machine a flexibility which permits the easy assembly of the various units so that their combination may be I modified to serve different purposes. The machine as described herein constitutes a recorder- reproducer and as such it includes the code selector 13, the tape punch 15, the tape reader 16 and the code translator 14. If it is desired to adapt the machine to recording functions only, such machine will include the code selector 13 and the tape punch 15. On the other hand, if the machine is to be adapted to reproducing functions only, it will include the tape reader 16 and the code translator 14. In whatever combination the units are assembled, the machine will include the printing mechanism so that it may be used i, the manner of a conventional power driven typewriter. While a specific form of the instrumentalities employed in the machine has been described for purpose of illustration, it is contemplated that numerous chan-es may be inade without departing from the spirit of th'e invention. M7hat is claimed is: 1. In a tape controlled writin@ machiiie having type bars, a machine frame, a powerroll in said frame for actuating said type bars, a control tape putich rnounted on one side of said frame, a control tape reader mounted on said frame adjacent said tape punch, a code translator within said frame, a single power shaft in said frame, and drive connections from said power shaft to said power roll, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said drive c6nnections between said power shaft, said tape punch and said code translator inr-ludin.a selectively operable drive clutches. 2. In a tape controlled writing machine having type bars, a machine frame, a power roU in said frame for actuating said type bars, a control tape punch mounted onoa-ie. side of said frame, a control tape reader mounted


41 @,106,446 49 bli said frame adjacent said tape punch, a code translator within said frame, a single power shaft in said frame, drive connections from said power shaft to said power rofl, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said connections including a one-revolution clutch between said power shaft and said tape punch, and means responsive to operation of said type bars for engaging and disengaging said clutch. 3. In a tape controlled writing machine having type bars, a machine frame, a power roll in said frame for actuating said type bars, a control tape punch mounted on one side of said frame, a control tape reader mounted on said frame adjacent said tape punch, a code translator within said frame, a single power shaft in said frame, drive connections from said power shaft to said power roll, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said connc,ctio.ns including a clutch between said power shaft and said tape punch, and electromagnetic means responsive to operation of said type bars for controlling said clutch. 4. In a tape controlled writing machine having type io bars, a machine frame, a power roU in said frame for actuating said type bars, a control tape punch mounted on one side of said frame, a control tape reader mounted on said frame adjacent said tape punch, a code translator within said frame, a single power shaft in said frame, drive connections from said power shaft to said power roll, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said connections including a clutch between said power shaft and said code translator, and means responsive to operation of said tape reader for controlling said clutch. 5. In a tape controlled writing machine having type bars, a machine frame, a power roll within said frame for actuating said type bars, a code selector within said frame, a control tape punch mounted on one side of said frame, a control tape reader mounted on said frame adjacent said tape punch, a code translator within said frame, a single power shaft in said frame, drive connections from said power shaft to said power roll, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said connections including a clutch between said power shaft and said tape punch, electromagnetic means for controlling said clutch, and means controlled by said code selector for energizing said electromagnetic clutch controlling means. 6. In a tape controlled writing machine having type bars, a machine frame, a power roll within said frame for actuating said type bars, a control tape punch mounted on one side of said frame, a control tape reader mounted on said frame adjacent said tape punch, a code translator within said frame, a single power shaft in said frame, drive connections from said power shaft to said power roll, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said connections including a clutch between said power shaft and said code translator, and electro-magnetic means for controlling said clutch. 7. In a 'Lape controlled writing machine having type bars, a Piachine frame, a power roll for actuating said type bars in said frame, a control tape punch mounted on one side of said frame, a control tape reader mounted on said frame adjace-Tit said tape punch, a code translator within said frame, a single power shaft in said frame, drive connections from said power shaft to said power roll, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said connections including a clutch between said power shaft and said code translator, electromagnetic means for controlling said clutch, and means controlled by said tape reader for energizing said electromagnetic clutch controlling means. 8. In a tape controlled writing machine, a main frame, type bars, a power roller for actuating said type bars in said frarne, code selecting mechanism, a frame for said code selecting mechanism, control tape punching mechanism, a frame for said control tape punching mechanism, control tape reading mechanism, a frame for said control tape reading mechanism, code translating mechanism, a frame for said code translating mechanism, means for motinting all of said frames in said main frame, a single power shaft in said rnain frame, and drive connections from said power shaft to said power roller, tape punching mechanism, tape reading mechanism, and code translating mechanism. 9. In a tade controlled typewriter having type bars, a- typ.-writer fiame, a power roll in said frame for actuating said type bars, a control tape punch mounted on one side of said frame, a code selector within said frame for on said frame adjacent said tape punch, a code transiatot within said frame, a single power shaft within said frame, drive connections from said power shaft to said power roll, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said drive connectioii between said power shaft aiid said tape punch including a drive clutch, an electromagnetic device for operating said clutch, nieans under control of said code selector for energizing said electromagnetic device, means for suppressing repeated operat;on of said punch 10 during a single operation of said code selector, and means responsive to operation of said tape punch for rendering sa;d stippressin.- means effective. 10. In a tape controlled typewriter having type bars, a- typewriter frame, a power roll in said frame for actuat- 15 ing said type bars, a control tape punch mounted on one side of said frame,. a plurality of punch selector magnets and means for energizing the same, a control tape reader mounted on said frame adjacent said tape punch, a code translator within said frame, a code selector within said @o ftame for controlling said tape punch, a single power shaft within said frame, drive connections from said power shaft to said power roll, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said drive connection between said power shaft and said tape ptinch including a drive clutch, an electro- 25 magnetic device for operating said clutch, an electric control circuit for said electromagnetic device, a code selector operated circuit maker in said control circuit adapted to close said circuit upon operation thereof, a relay for suppressing repeated operation of said electromagnetic dovice 30 during a single operation of said code selector, a circuit for said relay including a normally open circuit maker, and a ptinch member operatively associated with said last named circuit maker for closing the same upon- energization of any ol' said punch selector magnets. 35 11. In a tape controlled typewriter having typp bars, a typ-@writer frame, a power roll in said frame for actuatiiig said type bars, a control tape punch mounted oii one side of said frame, a control tape reader n- ounted oi-i said frame adjacent said tape 4o punch, a plurality of punch selector magnets and means for energizing the same, a code translator within said fraine, a code selector within said frame for controlling said tape punch, a single power shaft within said frame, drive connections from said power shaft to said 45 power roll, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said drive connection between said power shaft and said tape punch includin- a drive clutch, an electromagnetic device for operating 'said clutch, a code selector controlled circuit for energizing said electromagnetic device, a nor- 50 mally open second energizing circuit for said electromagnetic device, and means responsive to the energization of any one of said punch selector magnets for closing said second circuit. 12. In a tape controlled typewriter having type bars, a 55 typewriter frame, a power roll in said frame for actuating said type bars, a control tape punch mounted on one side of said frame, a control tape reader mounted on said frame adjacent said tape punch, a plurality of punch selector magnets and means for energizing the same, a code (10 translator within said frame, a code selector within sa-ld frame for controlling said tape punch, a single power shaft within said frame, drive connections from said power shaft to said power roll, tape punch, tape reader and code translator, said drive connection between said power shaft 65 and said tape punch including a drive clutch, an electromagnetic device for operating said clutch, a code selector controlled circuit for energizing said electromagnetic device, a normally open second circuit for said electroma,-netic device, a normally open circuit maker in said second 70 circuit, and a punch element movable upon energizatioii of any of said punch selector magnets associated with said circuit maker for closing said circuit upon energization of any of said punch selector magnets. 13. In a tape controlled writing machine havin- type 75 bars, a machine frame, a power roll in said frame f@or actuating said type bars, mechanism mounted on one side of said frame for forming coded control indicia in a control tape, a control tape reader mounted on said frame so adjacent said control indicia forming mechanism, a code translator within said frame, a single power shaft in said frame, and drive connections from said power shaft to said power roll, coded control indicia forming mechanism, tape reader and code translator, said drive connections controlling said tape punch, a control tape reader mounted Ubetween said power shaft, said coded control indicia


2,700,446 43 44 forining mechanism and said code tratislator including 1,643,057 Crumrine -------------- Sept. 20, 1927 selectively operable drive clutches. 1 ' 661,710 Thompson -------------- Mar. 6, 1928 14. In a tape controll-,d writing machine having type 1,800,399 Page --------- --------- Apr. 14, 1931 bars, a machine frame, a power roll in said frame for ac- 1,935,436 Crumrine -------------- Nov. 14, 1933 tuating said type bars, mechanism mounted on one side 5 1,945,097 Thompson et al - --------- Jan. 30, 1934 of said frame for forming coded ce-@itrol indicia ii 2, 1,950 762 Thompson ------------- Mar. 13, 1934 control tape, a control tape reader mounted on said f.- ame 1,975:79.1 Hopkins ---------------- Oct. 9, 1934 adjacent said control indicia forming mechanism, a code 2,066,978 Koca ------------------- Jan. 5, 1937 translator withiii said frame, a single power shaft in said 2,066,979 Koca ------------------ Jan. 5, 1937 frame, and drive connections from said power shaft to 10 2,168,441 Doty ------------------ Aug. 8, 1939 said power roll, coded control indicia forming mech2.- 2,258,211 Michelsen --------------- Oct. 7, 1941 nism, tape r--ader aiid code translator, said drive connec- 2,298,805 Norton - --------------- Oct. 13, 1942 tions including a clutch between said power shaft and 2,378,371 Tholstrup -------------- June 12, 1945 said coded control indicia forming inechanism, and elec- 2,487,373 Reppert ---------------- Nov. 8, 1949 tro.magnetic meaiis for controlling said clutch. 15 2,540,029 Hamilton -------------- Jan. 30, 1951 References Cited in the file of this patent 2,543,435 Buckley ---------------- Feb. 27, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,606,126 Housto-ii --------------- Nov. 9, 1926 20

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